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Old 1st June 2022, 02:55 PM   #1
Anthony G.
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Default About an unique Balinese keris motifs

Dear all, have you seen or hear this type of Balinese keris motif before? Naga over Srigala?
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Old 1st June 2022, 08:05 PM   #2
Jean
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It looks like a recent creation IMO
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Old 1st June 2022, 09:00 PM   #3
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My understanding of the word "Srigala" is that it may be a borrow word from Sanskrit and that the original word my have meant "jackal". Though i am having problems finding anything definite, From what o can tell the, Srigala is generally considered to be some kind of a wolf. But there are no wolves in Bali as far as i know or, for that matter, jackals. I suppose the word might be applied to wild dogs. But it doesn't seem that there is enough cultural attribution for Srigala for a depiction of one to end up on the gandik of perhaps the most important cultural artifact of the Balinese people. As Jean points out, this appears to be a new keris and unfortunately some folks seem willing to place just about anything on a keris these days.
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Old 2nd June 2022, 12:30 AM   #4
A. G. Maisey
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I do not know of the word "srigala" in Basa Bali, however, it can be a contraction of the word "serigala", which is a Malay word and that Malay word has come into Bahasa Indonesia.

In both BI and Malay it can mean a jackal/wolf/wild dog. It can also be applied to a person who presents a soft false face that hides a cruel, evil nature.

In Bali the dog is believed to be able to warn of the presence of spirits, especially of evil spirits.

In Hindu belief the dog is the mount of the deity Bhairava and (I believe but am uncertain) has some sort of connection with Yama, so many Hindu people believe that being kind to dogs can assist them when they leave the world of the visible.

My feeling is that the carver of this motif could well have had some spiritual value in mind when he carved the serigala, however, I cannot accept this carving as a motif that is usually associated with the keris.
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Old 2nd June 2022, 07:19 AM   #5
Anthony G.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean View Post
It looks like a recent creation IMO
I am unsure but it was claimed to be 19th century apparently.
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Old 2nd June 2022, 07:21 AM   #6
Anthony G.
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Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey View Post
I do not know of the word "srigala" in Basa Bali, however, it can be a contraction of the word "serigala", which is a Malay word and that Malay word has come into Bahasa Indonesia.

In both BI and Malay it can mean a jackal/wolf/wild dog. It can also be applied to a person who presents a soft false face that hides a cruel, evil nature.

In Bali the dog is believed to be able to warn of the presence of spirits, especially of evil spirits.

In Hindu belief the dog is the mount of the deity Bhairava and (I believe but am uncertain) has some sort of connection with Yama, so many Hindu people believe that being kind to dogs can assist them when they leave the world of the visible.

My feeling is that the carver of this motif could well have had some spiritual value in mind when he carved the serigala, however, I cannot accept this carving as a motif that is usually associated with the keris.

Thanks for the update and info.
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Old 3rd June 2022, 05:29 AM   #7
Anthony G.
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Originally Posted by David View Post
My understanding of the word "Srigala" is that it may be a borrow word from Sanskrit and that the original word my have meant "jackal". Though i am having problems finding anything definite, From what o can tell the, Srigala is generally considered to be some kind of a wolf. But there are no wolves in Bali as far as i know or, for that matter, jackals. I suppose the word might be applied to wild dogs. But it doesn't seem that there is enough cultural attribution for Srigala for a depiction of one to end up on the gandik of perhaps the most important cultural artifact of the Balinese people. As Jean points out, this appears to be a new keris and unfortunately some folks seem willing to place just about anything on a keris these days.
You are very right, I even witnessed a Madura made Javanese keris with Beethoven motif on it. Kind of upset me thou. And many bad traders try to pass off a modern made keris as an antique.
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