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Old 30th September 2017, 06:44 AM   #1
A. G. Maisey
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Default What & from Where?

I was not quite sure where I should put this little dagger.

Is it European or is it something from the East?

Does anybody know what it is?

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Overall length 10" (253mm.) blade length 6" (152mm.)
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Last edited by A. G. Maisey : 30th September 2017 at 08:25 AM.
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Old 30th September 2017, 07:35 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
I was not quite sure where I should put this little dagger.

Is it European or is it something from the East?

Does anybody know what it is?


Hello Alan,

Never seen anything like this. However, maybe giving some dimmensions might help.
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Old 30th September 2017, 01:30 PM   #3
Ren Ren
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Throwing dagger?

Last edited by Ren Ren : 30th September 2017 at 10:05 PM.
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Old 30th September 2017, 06:45 PM   #4
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No, definitely not. The hilt is heavier than the blade.

Incidentally, it is fine mechanical damascus.
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Old 30th September 2017, 07:16 PM   #5
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I have never seen anything quite like this before . but to me it looks like something from the Arts & Craft movement of the 1890s
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Old 30th September 2017, 08:52 PM   #6
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It looks Indian . The way the blade is worked in two huge fullers...
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Old 30th September 2017, 10:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey
No, definitely not. The hilt is heavier than the blade.

Incidentally, it is fine mechanical damascus.

In this case, I agree with
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinreadline
but to me it looks like something from the Arts & Craft movement of the 1890s
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Old 30th September 2017, 10:46 PM   #8
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My first impression was also Indian. The only basis for my opinion is the way that this blade, in common with some quality Indian blades, is treated as though steel was an entirely plastic medium. Working steel as though it was modeling clay is a feature which has made a deep impression on me.

That said, it is nothing I've ever seen before. It's a lovely, dramatic piece, to my eyes anyway.
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Old 1st October 2017, 01:17 AM   #9
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Precisely my impression: like clay.

Itís lines just flow..

One of the most beautiful examples of metalwork Iíve seen.
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Old 1st October 2017, 09:33 AM   #10
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Yes, the fullered blade looks Indian, but the hilt looks so much Art Deco, European...
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Old 1st October 2017, 11:06 AM   #11
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Yes, you're right Marius, it is a combination of influences, in fact, if I look at it, I see very decided keris characteristics in the blade:- the strong ada-ada, the deep and pronounced kruwingan (fullers), the defined kusen.

So --- West meets East?

Any clues there do you think?
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Old 1st October 2017, 03:48 PM   #12
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Well, I had thought to note that the carving of keris blades was another example of artful steelcraft, but the fullers took me kattar-ward for my guess. The strict geometry of the hilt throws me, though. I can see where European or Arts and Crafts sensibility might have come into play. Perhaps even a touch of Arts Nouveau or Deco?
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Old 1st October 2017, 05:53 PM   #13
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Thumbs up Very nice piece, Alan!

I'm with Bob - looks art nouveau / art deco to me, too.

I can see why the blade might resemble Indian (less so for Indonesian) work. I'd vote for European workmanship though.

Possibly a masonic piece?

Regards,
Kai
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Old 1st October 2017, 08:09 PM   #14
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Let us not forget that the Javanese keris was born from an Indian blade form, and during its developmental peiod was deeply influenced by art, culture and technology that came out of the Sub-Continent.
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Old 2nd October 2017, 04:36 AM   #15
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It looks thoroughly Indian to me.

What is the flower represented by the end of the hilt?
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Old 2nd October 2017, 07:13 AM   #16
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No idea Timo, I think its just a flower that fits into that place, the buds of the open flower are on the sides of the hilt.
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Old 4th October 2017, 01:42 PM   #17
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I put my vote on an art dagger.
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Old 4th October 2017, 02:35 PM   #18
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I wonder if this is not an example of modern bladesmithing art. If that is the case, with all the different influences the blade seems to hold, i am not sure that the area of origin would be of much significance in the global community of modern smithing art.
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Old 4th October 2017, 09:20 PM   #19
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I do agree that the form of this dagger does not fit any known style, at least to my eyes, thus perhaps mross and David could well be close to the truth.
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Old 5th October 2017, 12:17 AM   #20
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The form of this dagger is fraught with symbolism.
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