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Old 16th September 2017, 06:37 PM   #1
fernando
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Default A knife ... for cork working ?

I post this one here as although it is a knife it is not a weapon.
Te guy who gave it to me was told this is for the cork working craft. The cuttler marked in the blade apparently no longer exists. Browsing on cork tools this model doesn't show up.
Anyone here familiar with these things ? The blade is slightly (but deliberately) curved, and only one side is edged ... sharp, but not sharpened ... maybe because it didn't see any use ?
The handle is well sized and the tang well secured; definitely for applying effort.
Total length 24 cms (9 1/2").


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Old 17th September 2017, 02:41 AM   #2
M ELEY
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An interesting tool, reminding me of Japanese nata, gardening tools used to trim shrubs?

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...&highlight=nata

In any case, hope someone has more input. It is always interesting to see tool implements versus weapons and how some crossed paths (boarding axes/fire tools, lead cutter swords, etc).
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Old 17th September 2017, 04:15 PM   #3
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Interesting similarity Mark; but i guess only in "frontal shape". I see that the nata is a cleaver like tool, while the blade of the one i am posting is thinner and, this is important, being curved has a specific purpose. I have sent an email to a cork art forum, but i am not sure if they will ever answer.
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Old 17th September 2017, 11:34 PM   #4
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I was posting just to show the variety of tools that have this shape. I hope you get answers to your question, though. With a curved end, perhaps it was used to peel away layers? Cut the cork into circular patterns? The problem with tools are that they can be extremely specific in use. In other words, if this cork cutter is used in a wine bottle factory where the corks are carved to fit the bottle, etc, etc, You get the idea-
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Old 18th September 2017, 12:22 PM   #5
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Bottle corks are made using mechanical processes, you know, with a drill punch of different gauges.
To work up the cork bark ... probably but, what part, outer, inner ? to give it a roundish shape or carve into it ?
In any case, i haven't yet thrown the towel .
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Old 28th September 2017, 01:24 AM   #6
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Cork is peeled off the trunk. An unsharpened edge would help to pry the bark away without actually cutting into it. I've been to a cork 'farm'(?) In Portugal a LONG time ago. If I had paid more attention to the too l s, I could be of more help. As it is, my thoughts are speculative.

Check out the blade used at the 3:20 Mark in this . https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JewMikbKOI0.
Similar, but with what seems to be a keen edge. Watching the earlier footage, I see axes being used on the trees, but the ax handle being used to pry the bark from the trunk. So, again a less than sharp edge could be the intent.video
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Old 1st October 2017, 06:02 PM   #7
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Axes for praying cork bark are extremely sharp; i have handled a few. The purpose for such sharpness is to enable the harvester, a highly skilled operator, to only apply one cut on the bark, in a manner that the cork tree is not wounded. Their handle ends are tapered, with which the skilled harvester 'unsticks' the cut bark from the tree.
The preparation of the bark takes three different tools (knives), for the different stages; calibration, quality selection and the cuting of boards for manufactoring (bottle corks).
All such tools are sturdier than the one i have posted here, which is 'less industrial'. So if it really is for cork working, must be for a more ultimate detailed operation.
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