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Old 2nd March 2012, 04:58 PM   #1
fernando
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Default A Portuguese blunderbuss

Not a setup made of components from various origins, which often happens(over here), but an actual "born" blunderbuss example from the 18th. century; a luxury one, by the way.
A most unusual fine detail is the engraving inside the muzzle.
The heart shaped hole in the belt hook is also a nice romantic touch.
The lock style is called here half Portuguese & half French ... the late due to the internal spring action; although only with one position, that of full cock. The half cock postion is done with a hand moving pawl, which is considered one of the safest mechanisms for such purpose.
Original ramrod. Length of barrel 44 cms (17,3"). Total weight 3,070 Kgs. ( 6,8 oz.).


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Old 3rd March 2012, 05:28 PM   #2
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Any coments?
Even just an "i like it" ... or "i don't" ?
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Old 3rd March 2012, 08:36 PM   #3
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Hola, Fernando

" I like lt". ¿La llave (lock) es llamada "Fecho de Molinhas"? ¿El gancho que asegura la media monta (halfcock) es movido manualmente o tiene algún resorte?. A pesar de que tiene su muelle real en el interior, se distingue de la llave francesa porque el mecanismo de disparo es horizontal (como en el miguelete). El muelle del rastrillo (frizen) es de una sola lámina, como en la llave (lock) "de agujeta" y en algunos migueletes orientales.

Afectuosamente. Fernando K
Hello, Fernando

"I like lt." The lock is called "Fecho de Molinhas"? Does the pawl that ensures the half cock move manually or has a spring?. Although it has its main spring in the interior, it is different from French system because the mechanism is horizontal (as in the miguelete). The spring of the frizen is a single blade, as in the "agujeta" lock and in some eastern migueletes.

Affectionately. Fernando K

Last edited by fernando : 3rd March 2012 at 09:24 PM.
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Old 3rd March 2012, 09:49 PM   #4
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Thank you for your input Fernando.
No, this is not the "molinhas" lock. Although the manualy operated half cock external pawl (gancho) is that of the usual molinhas system, the internal spring is not that of the molinhas but the 'conventional' one, reason why this is called a half Portuguese half French lock.

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Old 4th March 2012, 04:33 PM   #5
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Hi Fernando,
I like it too!!!! . I was never convinced that the bell mouth
on blunderbusses contributed much to the spread of shot contrary to appearances and I guess the maker of this one may have been of a similar opinion hence the inclusion of decoration inside the barrel. Having said all that I'm sure the intimidating look and the volume of shot must have been very effective at close quarters as in deck clearing etc, I certainly would not like to be on the receiving end of a volley. Another nice inclusion for your collection of things that go "boom".
My Regards,
Norman.
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Old 4th March 2012, 05:10 PM   #6
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Thank you for input Norman,
I think that is more than proven that, the blunderbuss bell mouth purpose was for spreading the shot, is pure fantasy. A more realistic evidence was the facilitating of the load; We may also consider that its appearance would intimidate the guys in front of it ... be them bandits or a mutiny crew.
But these untruths belong in history with the same firmness as real facts.
This reminds me i have the same conviction about the so called sword breaker (rompe puntas) in some (many) cup hilted swords. I just can't buy the idea that you could manage to catch the adversary's sword tip with such reduced cavity and, even more implausible, bend it enough to break it .

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Old 4th March 2012, 09:08 PM   #7
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Hola Fernando:

Gracias por tu aclaración, y por las imágenes. Lo que no me queda claro es el gancho de seguridad: si era movido manualmente, cuando el pié de gato esta en posición de armado (full-cock) el gancho podía moverse e interferir en su caída.

Afectuosamente. Fernando K

Hi Fernando:

Thanks for your clarification, and images. What is not clear to me is the safety hook: if it was moved manually, when the cat's foot is in cocked position (full-cock) could move the hook and interfere in its fall.

Affectionately. Fernando
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Old 4th March 2012, 09:14 PM   #8
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This is most interesting. I like blunderbusses as a rule, and lacking information regarding Portuguese arms. I can see the connection here of the well-decorated barrel, to Indonesian Lantakas.
The lock isn't exactly a miquelete, is it?
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Old 5th March 2012, 02:29 PM   #9
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Beautiful gun, Fernando! Where do you manage to find all of your amazing pieces?! I really must follow you around some day!

In regards to the spreading of shot with flared muzzles, I agree; perhaps many believed it distributed shot broadly, but it is the length of barrel and the "looseness" of the shot that actually creates the shot-gun effect.

I also question the rompe puntas on cup-hilts as far as supposed function. I guess I could imagine that perhaps an extremely skilled duelist might temporarily snatch the point of his opponent's blade enough to deflect it momentarily?Just enough to set him "off-balance" before a killing thrust? Likewise, if it was such an important component of this type sword, why did the ones made in New Spain lack this detail?
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Old 5th March 2012, 05:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
Beautiful gun, Fernando! Where do you manage to find all of your amazing pieces?! I really must follow you around some day! ...

Thank you Mark,
Amazingly the finest (and more expensive) pieces that i manage to gather, do happen to come across, not needing to go look for them; for my disgrace, they look for me .

Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
... I also question the rompe puntas on cup-hilts as far as supposed function. I guess I could imagine that perhaps an extremely skilled duelist might temporarily snatch the point of his opponent's blade enough to deflect it momentarily?Just enough to set him "off-balance" before a killing thrust? ...

Well said; maybe only an extemely skilled duelist could catch his opponent's blade tip, but (most of) these cup hilted swords were used by simple men and in combat, where they handled them in a practical (brutal) way, without resource to any intrincate moves ... i would say
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Old 5th March 2012, 05:53 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fernando K
... Lo que no me queda claro es el gancho de seguridad: si era movido manualmente, cuando el pié de gato esta en posición de armado (full-cock) el gancho podía moverse e interferir en su caída.

What is not clear to me is the safety hook (pawl): if it was moved manually, when the cat's foot is in full cocked position, the pawl could move in and interfere in its fall. ...

The pawl (gancho) is not dinamic (has no spring=muele); it stays where you leave it.
There is a small protuberance (saliencia) in the hammer (pie de gato) round foot . When you pull it up to full cock, this will push back the pawl (gancho), so that it won't be on the way when the hammer comes down.

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Old 5th March 2012, 06:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broadaxe
This is most interesting. I like blunderbusses as a rule, and lacking information regarding Portuguese arms. I can see the connection here of the well-decorated barrel, to Indonesian Lantakas.
The lock isn't exactly a miquelete, is it?

The miquelete lock is completely another thing. The basic difference is that its main spring is in the outside of the plate. This had the advantage of not having to deeply carve the stock wood, hence not diminishing its strenght. For the same reason such main spring could be sturdier/stronger, something we can observe in most examples.
The action mechanism was also very particular, with its hammer foot operating both half and full cock by means of internal sears passing through the plate, suspending the hammer foot. As this hammer foot had its features similiar to a human sideburn, this lock was named (apart from later miquelete) "patilla" (patilha in portuguese).


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Old 6th March 2012, 01:19 PM   #13
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Hola Fernando:

Muy clara tu explicación. Te pregunto que diferencia hay entre el "fecho de molinhas" y el "fecho de anselmo"

Afectuosamente. Fernando K

Hi Fernando:

Very clear your explanation. I wonder what is the difference between "Molinhas" lock and "Anselmo" lock
Affectionately. Fernando K

Last edited by fernando : 6th March 2012 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 6th March 2012, 06:58 PM   #14
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To put very simple:

In the Anselmo lock the main spring is in the exterior and operates in the front foot of the hammer. In the Molinhas (little springs=resortes) lock, the main spring is inside and is activated by some horizontal sears (molinhas).

... I hope you understand, Fernando and all; i am no expert


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Old 6th March 2012, 08:58 PM   #15
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Understood, thanks
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