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Old 15th February 2009, 05:51 PM   #1
Matchlock
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Default Mid to Late 16th Century Patrons for Paper Cartridges

The earliest patrons or cartridge containers (Patronenköcher) seem to have been made as early as the 1540's, mostly in Nuremberg but, in the 1580's, also in Brunswick and Suhl, the latter for Saxony. The earliest dated sample known is of 1554.

They all consist of a wooden body drilled out for 4-7 paper cartridges and set into an iron frame which, in some cases, covers the wooden core completely. The lid is spring loaded and there are a few iron loops for leather straps to carry the patron. The catridges were stored with the balls bound on top. For loading, the patron was grabbed at the ball and drawn out, the ball was bitten off by the musketeer's or harquebusier's teeth, the powder was filled into the barrel, the ball went after it smoothly (as it was usually of smaller caliber than the barrel it rolled down easily) and the paper was crunched up and put down the muzzle. Then the whole load was rammed down the barrel with the ramrod.

The usual number of cartridge holes of ca. 4-7 indicates that this was the average number of rounds that 16th century guns could fire before at least the touch hole, and probably the barrel as well, had to be cleaned. There are, however, some patrons known to have received as many as 11 cartdriges. Interesting enough, we do not know of one single contemporary source of illustration of a patron although they are known to have been used together with both pistols and long guns but only for 'military' and semi-military purposes (e.g. by The Royal Saxon Electors' Guardsmen (Trabanten-Leibgarde).

The iron frame was mostly blued, on the Brunswick and some Nuremberg patrons it was finely embossed, and on some highly decorated patrons it was etched and the outer side of the wooden core was sometimes inlaid with engraved bone plaques. They matched the guns in style that they were used along with.

I attach samples from my collection and from other sources.

Michael
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Old 15th February 2009, 05:57 PM   #2
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Old 15th February 2009, 06:04 PM   #3
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Old 15th February 2009, 06:10 PM   #4
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Old 15th February 2009, 06:16 PM   #5
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The rest.

m
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Old 15th February 2009, 06:28 PM   #6
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Plus a few good items from Christie's December 2006 sale, together with the results.

Michael
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Old 16th February 2009, 06:27 PM   #7
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Fascinating material, Michael.
Thanks again and again for sharing such continuous treasures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
... the ball was bitten off by the musketeer's or harquebusier's teeth ...


I have once read that guys with missing or bad teeth, had problems in acquiring shooters jobs.

Fernando
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Old 4th February 2013, 07:29 PM   #8
Piotr M. Zalewski
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Dear Colleagues!
I am a restorator of antiques in National Museum in Warsaw, I specialize in metal objects and miscellaneous materials, but beside of this, I work to prepare to doctorate in art and military technique. My subject is about origin of Polish cavalry cartridge box (pouche). It means that I am looking for objects similar to, for example Lancer cartage box from Napoleon period, but from XVIIth or even XVIth century, Of course I know that it was in use others pouches & webbing patterns to carry ammunition, but I am very poor in this information. I have got all information about objects from Polish’s museums but it is not enough. In hope to find more information. Do you know anything about cartridge boxes from XVIIth century similar to these I present on my photos?
Looking forward for reply,
mgr Piotr M. Zalewski
Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie
On phothos you can see my copy (as a matter of fact it is reconstruction ) of polish National Cavalry cartige box for "Towarzysz" (nobil man in service as a private in cavalry) in use 1786-1791.
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Last edited by Piotr M. Zalewski : 4th February 2013 at 08:17 PM.
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Old 4th February 2013, 07:54 PM   #9
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Welcome to the forum Piotr,
I hope you find some answers to your question; surely if there are members familiar with this subject, they will soon post their comments .
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Old 4th February 2013, 08:08 PM   #10
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Thank you for invitation!
I have forgot to write, that on phothos you can see my copy(as a matter of fact it is reconstruction) of polish National Cavalry cartige box for "Towarzysz" (nobil-private) from 1786-1791.
Piotr M. Zalewski
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Old 5th February 2013, 01:28 PM   #11
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Great work
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