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Old 24th May 2005, 04:36 AM   #1
derek
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Default Piha Kaetta (not European)

Finally, one in my collection with a stylus. No wonder so few survive, it seems to be solid silver (top. bottom tip is steel fitted into the top) as opposed to steel covered in a thin silver sheet. I imagine a few have been pawned off over the years.

The grip is probably somewhat rare in that it has been completely covered in silver. A good example of the level of craftsmanship the four workshops of Kandy attained. Being solid, it reminds me of the "european piha" in the other thread. Who knows, they may have worked from a very similar example.




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Old 24th May 2005, 04:49 AM   #2
Conogre
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While I hate to just say "good job!", that's about all I can do, never having been lucky enough to add one to my own hodge-podge.
In truth, I'm happy to see items like this go to those who can really appreciate them, so......."Good Job!" and congratulations!
Mike
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Old 24th May 2005, 12:51 PM   #3
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Thanks, Mike.

Here is a little info about the stylus, obtained from Mr. Mohan Daniel, a Sri Lankan collector and gallery owner:

"The stylus is a 'ULKATUVA' used to train a student to write on a palm leaf. Once he is trained he is permitted to use a different type of stylus the 'PANHINDA'."

He also notes that a "student" was not necessarily a youth. In fact, this would not likely be the case as these knives were made for the Kandyan kings and worn by them or other chiefs.
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Old 24th May 2005, 01:03 PM   #4
tom hyle
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The swept back point is unusual; more usual is a somewhat saxlike tip that angles down from the spine to the cutting edge? Consequently, the sheath's tip is also "backwards" to the usual orientation.
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Old 24th May 2005, 02:16 PM   #5
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Hi Tom,

I don't know which is more common, but this style is usually smaller than other styles (note the exception to the far left), and is the only style I have seen with a stylus. I have seen some allusion to sinhalese terms for the various shapes and styles, but I haven't quite worked that out. Here is an "assortment":

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Old 25th May 2005, 02:20 AM   #6
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thanks.
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