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Old 28th September 2008, 02:56 AM   #1
celtan
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Default WWII Japanese Katana Blade Tang Inscriptions

Hi,

I recently acquired a WWII officer's katana blade, missing everything from habaki upwards. The blade has an interesting inscription, I was wondering if anyone here reads japanese cursive.

BTW, how difficult is it to adapt a new habaki..?

Best

Manolo

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Old 28th September 2008, 07:53 AM   #2
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Manolo,

I'm convinced the translation of the tang will appear shortly. We have members who are able to give a translation.

The sword is as far as I can judge from the pictures in an awful condition.

To adapt a new habaki and I suppose you mean the other fitings above it as well shouldn't be so difficult. There is enough for sale on ebay. Point is, will it fit this sword? So measurements of the merchandise is necessary. You could look for new replacements, but I strongly advise you to go for original replacements.
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Old 28th September 2008, 09:48 AM   #3
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The pictures are upside down.
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Old 28th September 2008, 11:39 AM   #4
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Greetings,

Yes, the image is upside down. After standing on my head for awhile I come up with "NOSHU (NO) JU KANEZANE SAKU KORE" which means KANEZANE (sword smiths name) a resident of NOSHU (MINO or present day GIFU providence) SAKU KORE (made this). The small stamp is what's known as a SHOWA stamp meaning it was made 1926 or later, till the end of the SHOWA era. This sword is likely made during WWII. The large stamp is called a KOKUIN, a counter mark with the kanji "Zane" in the center that we Americans call a turtle stamp. The red paint on the other side are assemblay numbers, worn but may be 26? He is listed as making Showato (machine made) and medium grade Gendaito (hand forged) blades. The formal style of kanji would indicate it is a Gendaito.

To have a proper habaki made is expensive and you will be extremely lucky to find one that fits exactly. Hope this is of some help.

Maskell
Jerry
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Old 28th September 2008, 02:59 PM   #5
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Thank you very much guys,

What do you know? So it was upside down! : )

Henk,Yep, it's in bad condition. I bought it just to rescue same from its owner. So far, I have only cleansed it with penetrating oil, the rust was awful, including some pitting.
Ernest, I'm trying to buy a period tsuba/tsuka et al, but the proper polish is simply out of the question. At least, it will be better than it was...
Jerry, your answer was very much appreciated, learned something new today. and it gives the blade more "personality".

Best regards

Manolo
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Old 24th November 2008, 11:21 PM   #6
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Hi Guys,

Got me a WWII Tsuba with all the trimmings. No habaki yet. I'm considering taking an alginate impression of the ricasso, making a stone-resin cat of the blade, and send same to have a habaki done.

Regarding the tsuba. Surprise!

It doesn't fit (but I won't yet quit).

Is there any manner in which I may open the tsuba, without destroying the wrappings, so I may adapt same to the tang?

Best

Manolo

BTW: Got me a couple more NCO swords, haven't had yet the time to clean them, so no pics just yet...
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Old 25th November 2008, 07:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stekemest
The pictures are upside down.


Perhaps if you were in Japan, on the other side the world from the USA, in the same position you were here, it would be the proper orientation..........
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Old 26th November 2008, 12:47 AM   #8
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But that's exactly what happened! I was standing right beside Hachikō in Shibuya when I took that photo...



Best

: ) M

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Marsh
Perhaps if you were in Japan, on the other side the world from the USA, in the same position you were here, it would be the proper orientation..........
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