Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 22nd May 2020, 04:15 PM   #1
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 62
Default An Haussa takouba

I was trying to get this amazing Haussa takouba in a recent auction, but sadly the bids went too high for my young museum worker wallet

Well, I still have the pictures to console myself, and I thought I could share them with you, now that the auction is over.


It was described as a "touareg saber [sic]" in the auction, but I think we will agree that it is actually a very nice XIXth (second part ?) century Haussa takouba. I think the blade was locally made and exhibit some really interesting forging flaws/delamination, that could suggest forge welded edges (I don't really know how to say that in English, hope it's understandable ...).
Attached Images
         
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2020, 08:24 AM   #2
Sajen
Member
 
Sajen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Germany, Dortmund
Posts: 7,029
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yvain
I was trying to get this amazing Haussa takouba in a recent auction, but sadly the bids went too high for my young museum worker wallet

Well, I still have the pictures to console myself, and I thought I could share them with you, now that the auction is over.


It was described as a "touareg saber [sic]" in the auction, but I think we will agree that it is actually a very nice XIXth (second part ?) century Haussa takouba. I think the blade was locally made and exhibit some really interesting forging flaws/delamination, that could suggest forge welded edges (I don't really know how to say that in English, hope it's understandable ...).


Hello Yvain,

Where are our takouba experts?

What make it Haussa? The pommel style? I ask because I want to learn.

I think what you mean is inserted edge but I am not sure, it's only a sign of welding what I see in the pictures.

Regards,
Detlef
Sajen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2020, 10:07 AM   #3
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 62
Default

Hi Detlef,

This type of "brazil nut" pommel can be found on takouba from various ethnic groups, but is an older style (pre XXth century).

Determining where a takouba was made is, in my opinion, always a game of guesses. Some details lead me to think it is an Haussa work, but I could be wrong.


It seems to me that this kind of big boxy guard, with engraved decorations and tin (?) wash is more usually associated with the Haussa (Tuareg ones, for example, are usually slimmer, with a different shape). (See this one for example : http://takouba.org/catalog/index.php/takouba-109)

Locally made blade that are on the larger side usually seems to be Haussa, like this one. (See here : http://takouba.org/catalog/index.ph...ausa-people/132)

The type of mounts on the scabbard is also usual for this group, with some really long mounts (the type of decoration and the tooling on the leather kind of looks like Haussa to me too). (Again, example here : http://takouba.org/catalog/index.ph...ausa-people/132)

Those are some of the hints (but also the general look of the sword), that makes me think it could be Haussa, but again, it's hard to be absolutely sure, and I could be wrong !

Regarding the edges, I meant to say "tranchants rapportés", but I don't really know how to translate it to English, so periphrase, here I go ! The forging flaws following the edges of the blade almost make me believe that it could have been made using three metal rods (two hard for the edges,one soft for the core) that would have been forge welded before shapping the blade itself, like it was done on some medieval swords. Although, I have very little knowledge about african metallurgy and don't know if they used (or even materially could use) this technique.
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2020, 11:06 AM   #4
Sajen
Member
 
Sajen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Germany, Dortmund
Posts: 7,029
Default

Hi Yvain,

Thank you for your explanation!

And looking again to the pictures from the blade, you could very well be correct, it look like this.

Regards,
Detlef
Sajen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2020, 06:39 PM   #5
Yvain
Member
 
Yvain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: France
Posts: 62
Default

You're welcome Detlef,

I've started studying the subject some months ago, and I find those swords fascinating, guess I'm part of the takouba fan club now !

I would have been really interested to examine the blade up close, as I have the suspiscion it would have given us a lot of interesting information regarding bladesmithing in the area, but I guess I will have to wait it to go on the market again eventually
Yvain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th May 2020, 05:51 PM   #6
Martin Lubojacky
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 768
Default

I also think that the ornament extruded in the skin (small triangles in the rows) indicatecsa "Nigerian" origin of the scabbard. (I hope that Iain as expert will add his comment)
Martin Lubojacky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 02:02 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.