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Old 28th October 2017, 12:40 PM   #1
Jon MB
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Default Stubby Sabre with blade marks

Hello All,

Hope you are having a good day.

This sabre is a mystery to me...

Overall length: 83cm (32")
Blade: 67 cm (26.5")

Stongly curved blade....

French-style brass hilt stamped '44'

'x' s on blade....

My guesses are usually wrong, but I though maybe boarding cutlass and or a 19th C. depot refurb in some some lonely colonial outpost.
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Old 28th October 2017, 12:41 PM   #2
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more pics..
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Old 28th October 2017, 01:19 PM   #3
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I would add that the grips make me uneasy, have never seen that type before on any military weapon..
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Old 28th October 2017, 01:58 PM   #4
Jim McDougall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon MB
I would add that the grips make me uneasy, have never seen that type before on any military weapon..


I agree Jon, but they are very well made hardwood and seem well intended. That hilt is as you say probably French and of course 19th c. of the forms 1820s+ (I do not have references at hand at moment) and does not go with the blade.
The markings on the blade resemble the 'twig and similar markings from Italian blades, and it seems more a hanger or short saber blade of mid to latter 18th c. These were heavily copied in Germany of course, but in this grouping and multiple configuration it does not seem this is Solingen.

I think you are right, probably a colonial rework in French regions, but more research to find more. Guesses are just a benchmark to continue research, and the cutlass idea is a good one. These kinds of combinations are not unusual to maritime situations, and officers on all manner of private vessels often had weapons put together or commissioned, sometimes in ports of call where artisans used available components to answer their requests.
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Old 28th October 2017, 02:18 PM   #5
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Excellent, thank you for the input, Jim. It seems little used, post refurb.
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Old 28th October 2017, 02:28 PM   #6
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You bet Jon!
Actually in my opinion, these reworked combinations which do seem to have seen some use post refurbishing, are most interesting. Many do not seem to realize that edged weapons often had long working lives even generations after the original components had been produced. This is especially true in remote or colonial locations where virtually everything was recycled. I have seen these kinds of combinations a lot in Mexican context where old elements of various previous types of swords were combined.
One had a briquette grip, a three bar guard and an old Spanish dragoon blade cut down with the 'Spanish motto' still legible.
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