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Old 1st December 2013, 05:11 PM   #1
Sajen
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Default Gunong for comment

I have just acquired this small gunong. I think it's an older example, my guess would be 1900-1920. I think that it will look very nice when the silver is polished and the blade cleaned. Your thoughts on this are welcome.
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Old 1st December 2013, 06:23 PM   #2
T. Koch
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Hi Detlef!

What a lovely little gem and sweet color to the tooth. You know I gotta ask: ...you gon' etch?

Do you or anybody else know when/where this type of Moro ferrule, where little balls and wire is soldered to it, was in use? I've also sometimes seen it on kris and I much prefer it to those ferrules with the chiseled okir. Is the type of decoration we see on this gunong (balls + wire) also referred to as okir, or does that only apply to carvings/chiselings?

Congrats in any case Detlef, and hope you show more pics after some TLC.


Cheers, - Thor
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Old 1st December 2013, 06:50 PM   #3
Sajen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Koch
Hi Detlef!

What a lovely little gem and sweet color to the tooth. You know I gotta ask: ...you gon' etch?

Do you or anybody else know when/where this type of Moro ferrule, where little balls and wire is soldered to it, was in use? I've also sometimes seen it on kris and I much prefer it to those ferrules with the chiseled okir. Is the type of decoration we see on this gunong (balls + wire) also referred to as okir, or does that only apply to carvings/chiselings?

Congrats in any case Detlef, and hope you show more pics after some TLC.


Cheers, - Thor


Hello Thor,

thank you for comment. Have to wait until I have received it but think that the blade will receive an etch with vinegar.

Your question regarding okir I will let for others (Jose??? ) since I am unsure about this but think you can call it okir as well.

Will post pictures after I have received it and have given it some care.

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 1st December 2013, 07:02 PM   #4
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I looked at this one too and have "too many irons in the fire" at the moment to buy anything else, but I agree it is an older one and should clean up into quite a fine piece.

Congrats on a good get!
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Old 1st December 2013, 07:43 PM   #5
Sajen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesS
I looked at this one too and have "too many irons in the fire" at the moment to buy anything else, but I agree it is an older one and should clean up into quite a fine piece.

Congrats on a good get!


Thank you Charles,

hope that our eyes don't let me fooled! Have looked already long for an ivory pommel gunong.

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 2nd December 2013, 02:26 AM   #6
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I like it! It is indeed early and I would suspect that the blade will be laminated with an etch.

Usually these come from Mindanao. Hard to tell if Maranao or Maguindanao, though what I can see of the okir points in this direction. As far as date is concerned, I think you are right, maybe 1900-1910.

On the chased versus filigree/granulation question, there is no certain time that these were used since everyone had access to the techniques, although the Maranao did more of this than anyone. In addition chasing goes back millenia in many cultures around the world, including the Philippines.
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