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Old 28th October 2017, 01:58 PM   #4
Jim McDougall
EAA Research Consultant
 
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon MB
I would add that the grips make me uneasy, have never seen that type before on any military weapon..


I agree Jon, but they are very well made hardwood and seem well intended. That hilt is as you say probably French and of course 19th c. of the forms 1820s+ (I do not have references at hand at moment) and does not go with the blade.
The markings on the blade resemble the 'twig and similar markings from Italian blades, and it seems more a hanger or short saber blade of mid to latter 18th c. These were heavily copied in Germany of course, but in this grouping and multiple configuration it does not seem this is Solingen.

I think you are right, probably a colonial rework in French regions, but more research to find more. Guesses are just a benchmark to continue research, and the cutlass idea is a good one. These kinds of combinations are not unusual to maritime situations, and officers on all manner of private vessels often had weapons put together or commissioned, sometimes in ports of call where artisans used available components to answer their requests.
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