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Old 12th September 2017, 10:33 AM   #4
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
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Apparently~ These rare swords - known as Temple Swords - are associated with the Nayar or Nair of Malabar of Southern India, believed circa 18th century. They were used for religious and domestic ceremonies.
This example has the classic flexible steel blade and is ~28" in length. They are double-edged but not necessarily combat worthy. Upper edge - near the crescent-moon-shaped tip - has small holes drilled to accept ringlets attached to "charms" or other trinkets such as bells (only two ringlets/trinkets remain on this example). The grip is iron - cylindrical in geometry - with light brass cross guard and langets (the fastening strips for the blade); also present - towards the pommel - are a series of brass discs, the last disc has small holes drilled to accept ringlets attached to "charms" or other trinkets such as bells as on the blade (only three ringlets/trinkets remain on this example). Overall length is ~34-1/2". These are considered very scarce if not rare.

These swords are very similar to - and often mistaken for - the African Ngombe “Execution” Swords common to the Ngombe people of central Zaire, Africa.
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