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Old 14th September 2014, 02:38 AM   #3
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
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More author's photos from 3rd June 1987, when, in the presence of the curator Dieter Ritzenhofen, was the first to identify, and photograph, the gun arrows at Burg Eltz, Bad Münstereifel, Germany.


Attachments,
appearing in order:
#1:
Details of the iron fletches of gun arrows preserved in the historic armory of Burg Eltz;

#2:
Rear protective plate of a gun arrow; please note the hemp binding;

#3-5:
Close-ups of the Burg Eltz arrows, two retaining their original armor piercing heads;
the one at bottom a modern replica;


#6:
Contemporary illustration of a huge siege machine shaped like a dragon breathing fire - and firing an incendiary arrow, the head wrought as a cage iron;
Roberto Valturio,
De re militari, fol. 79v; dated 1466;

#7&18:
A remarkable watercolor of a bundle of gun arrows ready to get fired from a cannon;
Cod.vind. 3069
, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek (ÖNB) Wien, fol. 70 v., dated 1411;

Following:
Line drawings of gun arrows;

Mariano Taccola: De ingeneis: Liber Primus Leonis, Liber Secundus Draconis.

Codex Latinus Monacensis
197, part II. Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (BSB) München, ca. 1440.

Bottom attachment:
- Two of the gun arrows preserved in the historic armory of Burg Eltz,
photographed on a special exhibition at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum Nürnberg, in March 2012;
one of them retaining its original armor piercing head shaped like that of a usual contemporary crossbow war bolt (German: Kriegs-Bolzeneisen); the arrowhead missing on some others.



Photos #1 through 5 attached all copyrighted by the author, Michael Trömner.
Photo at bottom copyrighted by the GNM Nürnberg.

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