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Old 20th June 2013, 10:58 AM   #26
Gustav
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Join Date: Jun 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey

In only one keris was the pamor a miring pamor. This was keris EDB.16 held in Copenhagen. This keris probably entered the collection in 1674. My note reads:- "pamor skilfully manipulated, no name"



According to the dissertation of A. Weihrauch, this keris has twistcore Pamor, 1 rod on one side, 2 welded together on other.

The keris of Sendai with some greater possibility has twistcore Pamor, Miring in any case.

The age of Kanjeng Kyai Ageng Kopek can be disputed (traditionally attributed to Demak). It also has twistcore Pamor.

The Keris of August the Strong in Dresden has a Pamor Miring, perhaps the name could be Blarak Ngirid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey

It is most probable that the skills to produce complex pattern welds were brought to Jawa by Muslim metal workers. These people settled on the North Coast and in parts of East Jawa, rather than in the hinterland. In my opinion the skills used by the people of the Southern Philippines to produce complex pattern welds were brought to the Southern Philippines by Muslim metal workers, just as they were brought to Jawa by Muslim metal workers.



This is also my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey

However, the metal workers who took the skills to the Philippines were very probably descendants of the original craftsmen who came from outside Maritime SE Asia. The craftsmen who spread the skills through Maritime S.E. Asia very probably came from the North Coast of Jawa and Madura.



This is very possible, yet need to be proved. I cannot quote my source, yet I have read about strong direct contacts of Philippine Sultanates with Osman Sultanate.
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