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Search: Posts Made By: M ELEY
Forum: European Armoury 26th March 2015, 01:00 AM
Replies: 2
Views: 127
Posted By M ELEY
Bill hook? Also, a stretch, but it could be a...

Bill hook? Also, a stretch, but it could be a combination boarding pike and gaff hook, which were not unheard of. Langets meant the shaft was probably fairly long, so I doubt it is just a tool, but a...
Forum: European Armoury 24th March 2015, 09:32 PM
Replies: 3
Views: 220
Posted By M ELEY
This is an impressive and spectacular piece! A...

This is an impressive and spectacular piece! A few years back, Fagan & Co. had some of these for a high price back in the day. They also had some kreigsickles. I love the medieval peasant tools!...
Forum: European Armoury 7th March 2015, 08:58 PM
Replies: 7
Views: 694
Posted By M ELEY
I would guess early to mid-19th as well. Grooved...

I would guess early to mid-19th as well. Grooved ebony and fluted ivory grips were popular c. 1780-1820's (see naval dirks from the latter period). The hilt pattern is usually more seen on either...
Forum: European Armoury 3rd March 2015, 11:33 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 412
Posted By M ELEY
Provenance is always hard when it comes to these...

Provenance is always hard when it comes to these types. When you think about it, even some of the issued naval swords, such as the old m1803 Brit, were often post-war swords used by merchantmen or...
Forum: European Armoury 2nd March 2015, 05:16 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 412
Posted By M ELEY
Of course you are both correct that it easily...

Of course you are both correct that it easily could be of the earlier (Rev War) period. If so, it might correctly be more identified as a true naval piece if used by an American sailor. Government...
Forum: European Armoury 1st March 2015, 04:54 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 412
Posted By M ELEY
Well Colin, you know what I'm going to say!...

Well Colin, you know what I'm going to say! Perhaps the quickest naval enthusiast to jump aboard for an ID, I'd say it was a very nice early to mid-19th century cutlass, probably private...
Forum: European Armoury 1st March 2015, 04:45 PM
Replies: 14
Views: 590
Posted By M ELEY
"Nando, just in case my previous post came...

"Nando, just in case my previous post came off as sarcastic, I meant no offense! Your framework is exceptional and exacting in many elements to the original such portable cages. We definitely want to...
Forum: European Armoury 28th February 2015, 09:59 PM
Replies: 14
Views: 590
Posted By M ELEY
Wow! Fernando, you did an exceptional job in...

Wow! Fernando, you did an exceptional job in creating an accurate housing for your portable cannon! Did you do all the work yourself, or did you have help- :cool: :)
Forum: European Armoury 25th February 2015, 01:16 PM
Replies: 12
Views: 551
Posted By M ELEY
Hmmm...The hilt on this piece looks exactly as...

Hmmm...The hilt on this piece looks exactly as you guessed, 17th. The blade has honest aging/patina to it. There were certainly ribbed blades with expanded bolsters at this time to aid in...
Forum: European Armoury 25th February 2015, 12:59 PM
Replies: 2
Views: 412
Posted By M ELEY
Nice little dirk! Turned bone handle, fits the...

Nice little dirk! Turned bone handle, fits the profile of a 'gambler's dirk'. Could be European or American. Often when one sees a 'provincial' piece, we guess American, but it could have just as...
Forum: European Armoury 22nd February 2015, 02:48 AM
Replies: 15
Views: 621
Posted By M ELEY
OPPS! Stand corrected about gauches. Some were...

OPPS! Stand corrected about gauches. Some were indeed 'open', with either a ring guard or just the extended quillons.

Hey Blue, if this piece turns out to be legit, you have got yourself a sweet...
Forum: European Armoury 22nd February 2015, 02:32 AM
Replies: 15
Views: 621
Posted By M ELEY
With roughly a 12" blade, it could easily be...

With roughly a 12" blade, it could easily be a parrying dagger, especially with the longer quillons. Strictly speaking, the Spanish main gauche had hilts that covered the hand with a semi-basket...
Forum: European Armoury 21st February 2015, 04:28 AM
Replies: 15
Views: 621
Posted By M ELEY
I agree with Will. Perhaps a Victorian-era...

I agree with Will. Perhaps a Victorian-era reproduction of high quality. Hate to use the word 'repro' when describing these types, as (most) were made of very high quality to represent their...
Forum: European Armoury 21st February 2015, 04:17 AM
Replies: 9
Views: 443
Posted By M ELEY
Very nice sword! Not an expert, just wanted to...

Very nice sword! Not an expert, just wanted to say that it's a real beaut. I would agree with the timeline based on the pattern, specifically the slot hilt feature. Clipped point swords were uncommon...
Forum: European Armoury 17th February 2015, 11:02 PM
Replies: 15
Views: 528
Posted By M ELEY
I've had 5 naval dirks over the years. No expert,...

I've had 5 naval dirks over the years. No expert, but I'm betting naval dirk, whether repaired, cut down hilt or what have you. I've had one like this one in the past, with a 3 1/2" hilt and 8"...
Forum: European Armoury 16th February 2015, 02:27 PM
Replies: 15
Views: 528
Posted By M ELEY
If I had to place it, I'd say American, ca....

If I had to place it, I'd say American, ca. 1800-20 period.

Straight to the point, without question, it's a naval dirk, not a bowie, bootk knife, gambler's dirk, gaucho knife, etc, etc. As such, it...
Forum: European Armoury 11th February 2015, 02:34 PM
Replies: 10
Views: 736
Posted By M ELEY
Hello Jesse, You have a very interesting sword...

Hello Jesse,
You have a very interesting sword and would add that you should keep all correspondence with the original owners, any records they have proving provenance, etc. Stephen Decatur was a...
Forum: European Armoury 10th February 2015, 03:11 PM
Replies: 10
Views: 736
Posted By M ELEY
The history of the piece makes sense. The Barbary...

The history of the piece makes sense. The Barbary Corsairs were 'just across the way' from the Iberian Peninsula, with trade routes and potential captures from Spanish ships. The blade is from a...
Forum: European Armoury 4th February 2015, 07:09 AM
Replies: 15
Views: 575
Posted By M ELEY
Really an interesting sword! Not much to add over...

Really an interesting sword! Not much to add over what the others have already said. Definitely French, not only for the blade, but for the lion pommel (seen on certain types of french swords) and...
Forum: European Armoury 17th January 2015, 10:19 PM
Replies: 2
Views: 424
Posted By M ELEY
Great source of info!

Hello Glenn,

Spectacular amount of information here on eagle heads! Thanks for posting these! My favorite are the Prahl types and the early 4-slot hilt patterns. I had a question for you. You have a...
Forum: European Armoury 8th January 2015, 03:05 AM
Replies: 6
Views: 864
Posted By M ELEY
Yes, I'm very glad David created such an...

Yes, I'm very glad David created such an informative site as well! Especially the section on private purchase weapons, which (to my knowledge) have very little research and almost no information to...
Forum: European Armoury 4th January 2015, 08:24 PM
Replies: 1
Views: 398
Posted By M ELEY
Very nice piece with great patina. My guess is...

Very nice piece with great patina. My guess is that it is an 18th century spontoon head, although which European nation is anyone's guess. I see why you thought Indo-Persian with the general shape,...
Forum: European Armoury 4th January 2015, 08:10 AM
Replies: 6
Views: 864
Posted By M ELEY
Spectacular site with some great artifacts...

Spectacular site with some great artifacts supporting your data. Information like this is very important to fellow collectors. Thanks for posting it here, David! You have PM.
Mark

P.S. Is that...
Forum: European Armoury 29th December 2014, 06:04 PM
Replies: 8
Views: 454
Posted By M ELEY
And that date perfectly matches what Jasper, Jim...

And that date perfectly matches what Jasper, Jim McD. and others were saying was the period of the sword based on the design. Excellent catch, Dirk! Andi, you are a lucky gent to own this hanger!!!
Forum: European Armoury 26th December 2014, 11:17 PM
Replies: 5
Views: 488
Posted By M ELEY
Opps! Sorry about the misread. Yes, a sword cane...

Opps! Sorry about the misread. Yes, a sword cane it is, then. Popular with gentlemen of status for defending themselves against potential thieves. A very nice item!
Showing results 1 to 25 of 500

 
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