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Search: Posts Made By: M ELEY
Forum: European Armoury 16th January 2021, 04:19 AM
Replies: 37
Views: 1,849
Posted By M ELEY
Excellent point, Wayne, and exactly the type of...

Excellent point, Wayne, and exactly the type of thought process involved with naval fighting/boarding parties. Why kill if you can just take the fight out of them. Just as a surrendered ship was...
Forum: European Armoury 13th January 2021, 09:12 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 255
Posted By M ELEY
Very nice briquet. As discussed before with these...

Very nice briquet. As discussed before with these types, many were infantry swords, but some definitely were for sea service. It is an interesting side note that many boarding cutlasses did NOT have...
Forum: European Armoury 10th January 2021, 04:33 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Thank you very much for these references,...

Thank you very much for these references, Stephan! I have that last one and hope to pick up a copy of Baldwin's soon. Of course, Peterson would be the jewel to the crown, but as it is out of print,...
Forum: European Armoury 2nd January 2021, 11:53 AM
Replies: 18
Views: 804
Posted By M ELEY
Most Spanish swords of this period had blades...

Most Spanish swords of this period had blades made in Solingen. Germany was basically producing for most of Europe at that time, with their blades being used in Scotland for basket-hilts, in American...
Forum: European Armoury 31st December 2020, 02:25 AM
Replies: 18
Views: 804
Posted By M ELEY
Very nice Spanish (or Portuguese?) cup-hilt,...

Very nice Spanish (or Portuguese?) cup-hilt, Bruno! I believe this pattern was referred to as a 'sail hilt' and dates to the last quarter of the 18th century. As you pointed out, the blade, cup and...
Forum: European Armoury 31st December 2020, 02:16 AM
Replies: 2
Views: 359
Posted By M ELEY
Hello Colin. Just wanted to say what a cool piece...

Hello Colin. Just wanted to say what a cool piece this is! Very strange that the knife wouldn't be maker-marked, as most 19th c. cutlery and such usually was...unless this was truly made for export...
Forum: European Armoury 30th December 2020, 05:28 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
More pics to clarify (or muddy the waters further...

More pics to clarify (or muddy the waters further :D :D ) of the ax. Note that the langets are extremely rough at the eye. Likewise, they are not identical to each other in length/thickness and they...
Forum: European Armoury 30th December 2020, 04:33 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Hello Jim! Wow, do you have all of these sources?...

Hello Jim! Wow, do you have all of these sources? I'm still working on getting my hands on several of the sources you mention here. I'm making a copy of this thread for my own records, so thanks for...
Forum: European Armoury 30th December 2020, 04:19 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Hello David. Thank you so much for posting that...

Hello David. Thank you so much for posting that piece! Yes, I had heard that boarding axes sometimes wound up in Native hands. It makes total sense, as both trade spike axes and boarding axes...
Forum: European Armoury 30th December 2020, 04:16 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Hello Colin and thank you for responding to the...

Hello Colin and thank you for responding to the thread. Yes, you are absolutely correct that there are many fakes out there, but 95% of them are the pipe tomahawks, which fetch thousands and even...
Forum: European Armoury 30th December 2020, 03:55 AM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
Thanks for commenting, David. I get it and have...

Thanks for commenting, David. I get it and have to decide if I can 'live' with an uncertain piece in the collection or not. Perhaps I'll just buy one of the known examples. I'm just drawn to some of...
Forum: European Armoury 29th December 2020, 02:57 PM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
In 'Native American Weapons" by Colin...

In 'Native American Weapons" by Colin Taylor, we see a very similar knife to my stag hilted piece on pg. 55
Forum: European Armoury 28th December 2020, 10:51 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
Excellently put, Jim! And I appreciate those...

Excellently put, Jim! And I appreciate those quotes as well as I haven't looked at my copy in awhile. i was just about to make this very same statement, but not nearly as eloquently as you have! I...
Forum: European Armoury 28th December 2020, 03:19 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
It's OK, Bruno. As I said myself, I 'believed it...

It's OK, Bruno. As I said myself, I 'believed it to be' a boarding ax. This particular area of collecting is dicey at best and I'll take your opinion under consideration. Hoping to get a few more in...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 11:14 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Finally, just to cap off the subject of fur trade...

Finally, just to cap off the subject of fur trade weapons, no collection would be complete without the side knives carried during the period. Here is a primitive bowie-style knife with clipped point,...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 11:01 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Hammer pole axes were another popular ax of this...

Hammer pole axes were another popular ax of this era (18th-19th c.), but with very rare exception, were not used by the native peoples. These types were carried by soldiers, fur traders, explorers,...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 10:41 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
The fascinating thing about these axes is that...

The fascinating thing about these axes is that they truly 'walked the path' between two separate worlds. Made by Europeans, but sold to and used by Native Americans, they are both Ethno and non-Ethno...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 10:26 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Of course spike tomahawks were not exclusive to...

Of course spike tomahawks were not exclusive to Native American use. Fur trappers, colonial soldiers, 'mountain men', scouts, etc, also used such pieces. During the French and Indian War, there were...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 10:04 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Of course, the question always comes up as to...

Of course, the question always comes up as to what is a real tomahawk, what is just a tool and what is a downright fake. If you decide to go into this field of collecting, you sometimes have to take...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 09:58 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Here are similar examples from the trade tomahawk...

Here are similar examples from the trade tomahawk page and also museum examples.
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 09:56 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 577
Posted By M ELEY
Native American spike tomahawk, fur trade pole axes and skinning knives

Although my primary collecting has always been maritime, I became fascinated with spike tomahawks when I learned that they were contemporary 'cousins' of the boarding ax. Here is one I just picked up...
Forum: European Armoury 27th December 2020, 04:24 AM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
Thank you, Jim, for your input on this piece....

Thank you, Jim, for your input on this piece. Yes, I had forgotten Peterson's amazing tome on the subject of spike axes/tomahawks. I have wanted a copy of this volume for years, but they are long out...
Forum: European Armoury 26th December 2020, 02:38 AM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
Thank you, my friend! Yes, you get it exactly! :D

Thank you, my friend! Yes, you get it exactly! :D
Forum: European Armoury 25th December 2020, 05:22 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 545
Posted By M ELEY
A 19th century naval boarding ax

Here is what I believe to be a true 19th century private purchase naval boarding ax. I say 'true' because there are many mimics of such things, including fire axes and trench tools for soldiers. My...
Forum: European Armoury 24th December 2020, 10:52 PM
Replies: 10
Views: 532
Posted By M ELEY
Very nice gentleman's smallsword! As Jim points...

Very nice gentleman's smallsword! As Jim points out, I believe mid- to late 18th based on the large pas d'ane. The blade certainly looks made for business during a time when just walking to the pub...
Showing results 1 to 25 of 500

 
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