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Search: Posts Made By: Timo Nieminen
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 16th July 2015, 04:05 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 765
Posted By Timo Nieminen
"Tameshigiri", literally...

"Tameshigiri", literally "test-cutting" iirc. Usually performed by professional sword-testers, "shitoka". Perhaps not the most skilled samurai even in the field of swordsmanship, but expert in their...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th July 2015, 08:40 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 765
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Another example: a Japanese military tsuba....

Another example: a Japanese military tsuba. Either shrapnel/shell fragment or it's been run over by a heavy vehicle. If shrapnel, it went through either the hilt or blade before hitting the...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th July 2015, 08:33 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 765
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Battle damage

Lots of old weapons have damage to the edge - chips, nicks, rolls, etc. Sometimes these are from use or misuse of the weapon as a tool, from children (including adult children) playing with it, and...
Forum: European Armoury 11th July 2015, 07:16 AM
Replies: 4
Views: 257
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Originally a normal spontoon or glaive where most...

Originally a normal spontoon or glaive where most of the head broke off?
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 4th July 2015, 08:25 AM
Replies: 15
Views: 373
Posted By Timo Nieminen
I think that if the truncheon were newly...

I think that if the truncheon were newly discovered by the English-speaking world, "jitte" would be the best choice for its English name. However, "jutte" is already out there, and common. We could...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 10:57 PM
Replies: 15
Views: 373
Posted By Timo Nieminen
There are many examples of the same name being...

There are many examples of the same name being used for different weapons. Apart from broad generic terms like "sword", "spear", "dao", we have "kris" being used for very different Indonesian and...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 12:45 PM
Replies: 15
Views: 373
Posted By Timo Nieminen
More of a guard than the typical shashka,...

More of a guard than the typical shashka, Philippine sword, dha, stiletto, kukri, and in some ways, better than a Medieval European cruciform sword. Sometimes "better" isn't better. (But sometimes it...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 12:32 PM
Replies: 15
Views: 373
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The weapon you have (jitte/jutte) is...

The weapon you have (jitte/jutte) is 十手, "ten hands", which can be read as "power of ten hands weapon". In hiragana, じって, which has Hepburn romanisation "jitte"....
Forum: European Armoury 2nd July 2015, 01:14 AM
Replies: 7
Views: 403
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Looks mid-16th century. Though at least some of...

Looks mid-16th century. Though at least some of the elements of this style are seen on blades about 1500, most examples I've seen are mid-16th, and some are later. I don't think it could be as early...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 29th June 2015, 09:44 AM
Replies: 14
Views: 498
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The blade looks very Philippines, and not Chinese...

The blade looks very Philippines, and not Chinese at all. The hilt looks Chinese to me.

Here is a photo of a sword I thought looked quite Chinese. The grip has a similar shape to yours (though the...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 29th June 2015, 01:13 AM
Replies: 14
Views: 498
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Reminds me of this one:...

Reminds me of this one: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=19754
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 21st June 2015, 01:20 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 401
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The original Italian is: uno con un gran terciado...

The original Italian is:
uno con un gran terciado (che č como una scimitarra, ma pių grosso)

The whole original text is available at...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 15th June 2015, 09:06 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 289
Posted By Timo Nieminen
3 Shri Chandra S(D?) 9/57 3 Shri Chandra is the...

3 Shri Chandra S(D?) 9/57

3 Shri Chandra is the prime minister of the time (when it was marked; early 1900s). SD is a unit abbreviation.

(I'm not good at reading these; might be errors in the...
Forum: European Armoury 12th June 2015, 12:37 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 517
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Point of balance is very much in the middle of...

Point of balance is very much in the middle of the common range. And, looking at the sword, unsurprising.

Doesn't mean it's "well-balanced". As in my first post, I'd look for forward pivot...
Forum: European Armoury 11th June 2015, 09:30 PM
Replies: 8
Views: 517
Posted By Timo Nieminen
9.2cm sounds OK. What kind of hilt? How heavy is...

9.2cm sounds OK. What kind of hilt? How heavy is the sword.

The main thing affecting the balance will be the weight of the hilt. With heavier full baskets, the centre of balance can be as close as...
Forum: European Armoury 10th June 2015, 12:45 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 517
Posted By Timo Nieminen
I think the location of the centre of gravity...

I think the location of the centre of gravity (centre of mass, point of balance) is secondary to the location of the centre of percussion (forward pivot point, centre of oscillation), which should be...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 5th June 2015, 10:36 PM
Replies: 2
Views: 317
Posted By Timo Nieminen
It would be stronger with a bolster, or with...

It would be stronger with a bolster, or with wrapping. Possibly much stronger. But if the wood is resistant to splitting, and the tang isn't inserted into an under-sized hole in the hilt (which would...
Forum: European Armoury 27th May 2015, 01:42 AM
Replies: 4
Views: 365
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Looks like a glaive socket, European, maybe 16th,...

Looks like a glaive socket, European, maybe 16th, 17th century. Parade/guard/processional glaive, rather than a battlefield weapon. Looks like it might have had langets.

Some complete examples, with...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 23rd April 2015, 01:04 AM
Replies: 2
Views: 373
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Whether it's the earliest depends on where you...

Whether it's the earliest depends on where you draw the borders for Eastern Europe. Specifically, the border between Europe and Asia. If you're willing to go as far East as the the north Caucasus,...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 22nd April 2015, 08:27 AM
Replies: 7
Views: 1,112
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Feuerbach, A.M.; (2002) Crucible steel in Central...

Feuerbach, A.M.; (2002) Crucible steel in Central Asia: production, use and origins. Doctoral thesis, University of London.
http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1317704/ (71Mb)
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th April 2015, 10:23 AM
Replies: 22
Views: 788
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Indian. The bidents look very Indian, and the...

Indian. The bidents look very Indian, and the only threaded spears I've seen have been Indian or modern Western. The singles don't look non-Indian.
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 12th April 2015, 10:51 PM
Replies: 4
Views: 509
Posted By Timo Nieminen
It's Chinese. But it's a modern Chinese fantasy...

It's Chinese. But it's a modern Chinese fantasy sword/knife, not a fake/repro historical sword (nor an actual antique).

I've seen similar being advertised as Mongolian.
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 28th March 2015, 09:11 PM
Replies: 8
Views: 1,013
Posted By Timo Nieminen
What are the signs that tell you this? To me, it...

What are the signs that tell you this?

To me, it looks normal for a German-made blade, 17th/18th century. True, these tend to be marked, but often enough at the base of the blade where it might be...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 14th March 2015, 11:25 PM
Replies: 1
Views: 423
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Forged and cast zaghnal

Inspired by http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=19668 I thought I'd photograph my zaghnals. Both have modern hafts. One is cast, and I have no reason to think it anything other than a...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 27th February 2015, 03:12 AM
Replies: 17
Views: 1,121
Posted By Timo Nieminen
To simplify, we could say that until mid-Heian,...

To simplify, we could say that until mid-Heian, spears (hoko) were the most popular polearms, mid-Heian to early Muromachi naginata, and mid-Muromachi onwards, spears (yari). Possibly accompanied by...
Showing results 1 to 25 of 244

 
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