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Search: Posts Made By: Timo Nieminen
Forum: European Armoury Today, 04:20 AM
Replies: 6
Views: 122
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Scabbards deteriorate faster than swords....

Scabbards deteriorate faster than swords. Somebody threw them out.

The only old surviving Japanese odachi scabbards I've seen are for temple swords, and I don't recall seeing a scabbard for a Ming...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons Yesterday, 04:13 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 341
Posted By Timo Nieminen
This kind of separate blade can be seen on...

This kind of separate blade can be seen on various Indian spears. In this case, it (probably) means the blade is relatively thin. So not a lance head intended to pierce armour with. So if a cavalry...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 2nd September 2015, 03:37 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 341
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Length and balance can give some idea of whether...

Length and balance can give some idea of whether it's a lance or an infantry spear. My first thought is that it's a pretty long blade for a cavalry lance (or a very short haft).

Might not be the...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 16th August 2015, 06:12 AM
Replies: 36
Views: 1,117
Posted By Timo Nieminen
What kind of weights are we talking about? In my...

What kind of weights are we talking about?

In my limited experience, older Moro kris sit at about 600-700g, and are ergonomically nice (some, even beautiful) fighting weapons (approximately the same...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 14th August 2015, 12:25 AM
Replies: 9
Views: 486
Posted By Timo Nieminen
There have been types of dao without guards,...

There have been types of dao without guards, including recent ones (see pic), and plenty of Han through Tang dao. But I think most, if not almost all, dadao had guards. I don't remember seeing a...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 14th August 2015, 12:10 AM
Replies: 41
Views: 1,285
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Yes. This is true of many, many sword hilts....

Yes. This is true of many, many sword hilts. While some sword hilts have a defensive function, the protection is rather minimal on many, and many don't provide any protection at all. The one...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th August 2015, 02:23 AM
Replies: 9
Views: 486
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Might not be pattern-welding as such. Even if...

Might not be pattern-welding as such. Even if it's made from modern scrap steel, it can still be made from a bunch of pieces welded together. Inserted-edge construction is common, with a high-carbon...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th August 2015, 01:52 AM
Replies: 41
Views: 1,285
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Just hold it in a hammer-grip, keep your wrist...

Just hold it in a hammer-grip, keep your wrist fairly straight (so the blade is at 90 degree to the forearm), and slice away (i.e., draw cut).

The snug fit lets you securely hold the sword without...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 16th July 2015, 04:05 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 851
Posted By Timo Nieminen
"Tameshigiri", literally...

"Tameshigiri", literally "test-cutting" iirc. Usually performed by professional sword-testers, "shitoka". Perhaps not the most skilled samurai even in the field of swordsmanship, but expert in their...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th July 2015, 08:40 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 851
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Another example: a Japanese military tsuba....

Another example: a Japanese military tsuba. Either shrapnel/shell fragment or it's been run over by a heavy vehicle. If shrapnel, it went through either the hilt or blade before hitting the...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 13th July 2015, 08:33 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 851
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Battle damage

Lots of old weapons have damage to the edge - chips, nicks, rolls, etc. Sometimes these are from use or misuse of the weapon as a tool, from children (including adult children) playing with it, and...
Forum: European Armoury 11th July 2015, 07:16 AM
Replies: 4
Views: 352
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Originally a normal spontoon or glaive where most...

Originally a normal spontoon or glaive where most of the head broke off?
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 4th July 2015, 08:25 AM
Replies: 16
Views: 614
Posted By Timo Nieminen
I think that if the truncheon were newly...

I think that if the truncheon were newly discovered by the English-speaking world, "jitte" would be the best choice for its English name. However, "jutte" is already out there, and common. We could...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 10:57 PM
Replies: 16
Views: 614
Posted By Timo Nieminen
There are many examples of the same name being...

There are many examples of the same name being used for different weapons. Apart from broad generic terms like "sword", "spear", "dao", we have "kris" being used for very different Indonesian and...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 12:45 PM
Replies: 16
Views: 614
Posted By Timo Nieminen
More of a guard than the typical shashka,...

More of a guard than the typical shashka, Philippine sword, dha, stiletto, kukri, and in some ways, better than a Medieval European cruciform sword. Sometimes "better" isn't better. (But sometimes it...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 3rd July 2015, 12:32 PM
Replies: 16
Views: 614
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The weapon you have (jitte/jutte) is...

The weapon you have (jitte/jutte) is 十手, "ten hands", which can be read as "power of ten hands weapon". In hiragana, じって, which has Hepburn romanisation "jitte"....
Forum: European Armoury 2nd July 2015, 01:14 AM
Replies: 7
Views: 457
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Looks mid-16th century. Though at least some of...

Looks mid-16th century. Though at least some of the elements of this style are seen on blades about 1500, most examples I've seen are mid-16th, and some are later. I don't think it could be as early...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 29th June 2015, 09:44 AM
Replies: 14
Views: 553
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The blade looks very Philippines, and not Chinese...

The blade looks very Philippines, and not Chinese at all. The hilt looks Chinese to me.

Here is a photo of a sword I thought looked quite Chinese. The grip has a similar shape to yours (though the...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 29th June 2015, 01:13 AM
Replies: 14
Views: 553
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Reminds me of this one:...

Reminds me of this one: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=19754
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 21st June 2015, 01:20 PM
Replies: 11
Views: 470
Posted By Timo Nieminen
The original Italian is: uno con un gran terciado...

The original Italian is:
uno con un gran terciado (che č como una scimitarra, ma pių grosso)

The whole original text is available at...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 15th June 2015, 09:06 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 332
Posted By Timo Nieminen
3 Shri Chandra S(D?) 9/57 3 Shri Chandra is the...

3 Shri Chandra S(D?) 9/57

3 Shri Chandra is the prime minister of the time (when it was marked; early 1900s). SD is a unit abbreviation.

(I'm not good at reading these; might be errors in the...
Forum: European Armoury 12th June 2015, 12:37 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 571
Posted By Timo Nieminen
Point of balance is very much in the middle of...

Point of balance is very much in the middle of the common range. And, looking at the sword, unsurprising.

Doesn't mean it's "well-balanced". As in my first post, I'd look for forward pivot...
Forum: European Armoury 11th June 2015, 09:30 PM
Replies: 8
Views: 571
Posted By Timo Nieminen
9.2cm sounds OK. What kind of hilt? How heavy is...

9.2cm sounds OK. What kind of hilt? How heavy is the sword.

The main thing affecting the balance will be the weight of the hilt. With heavier full baskets, the centre of balance can be as close as...
Forum: European Armoury 10th June 2015, 12:45 AM
Replies: 8
Views: 571
Posted By Timo Nieminen
I think the location of the centre of gravity...

I think the location of the centre of gravity (centre of mass, point of balance) is secondary to the location of the centre of percussion (forward pivot point, centre of oscillation), which should be...
Forum: Ethnographic Weapons 5th June 2015, 10:36 PM
Replies: 2
Views: 357
Posted By Timo Nieminen
It would be stronger with a bolster, or with...

It would be stronger with a bolster, or with wrapping. Possibly much stronger. But if the wood is resistant to splitting, and the tang isn't inserted into an under-sized hole in the hilt (which would...
Showing results 1 to 25 of 252

 
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