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-   -   15th century short wrought iron barrels - why there are so many around (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=7927)

Matchlock 20th December 2008 04:41 PM

15th century short wrought iron barrels - why there are so many around
 
12 Attachment(s)
Historical illustrative sources prove that not all of these short wrought iron barrels were necessarily stocked invidually 500-600 years ago. Most of them probably formed parts of Gothic multibarrel guns - or should we refer to them rather as refined constructions?

Many of them were certainly just used as noisemakers (Böller) in later centuries.



Btw, I am afraid I will not be able to continue posting regularly for some time. I have to be busy writing a sample chapter of what I am hoping will become my next book and will really be a Magnum Opus. Thank you so much, Ed, my good friend!

Please be patient, Fernando, Jim, Richard (in alphabetical order) and all the others.:shrug: ;):)

Michael

fernando 20th December 2008 06:48 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
... Please be patient, Fernando, Jim, Richard (in alphabetical order) and all the others...


.


Matchlock 21st December 2008 02:50 AM

That's just so nice, Fernando ... :) :cool:

Thanks, buddy!

Michael

Pukka Bundook 21st December 2008 07:00 AM

I think Fernando says it well for all of us Michael!!

We will try to be patient, but withdrawl can be very difficult at times.....But we do wish you all the very best in writing your book!


Richard.

Bill M 21st December 2008 10:54 AM

Michael,

I also greatly enjoy your posts. You mention a "Magnum Opus." Is this some kind of "Large Caliber Opus?" Oh well enough of "Magnum" puns, but in a gun-oriented thread, what do you expect?

Anyway could you let us know, either here in the Forum, or privately in email a list of other, already published, books you have written that we may have continuing access to your knowledge in the long months ahead?

Kind regards,
Bill

Matchlock 21st December 2008 01:37 PM

Bill,

Thanks for your kind lines.

In speaking of a Magnum Opus I mean that this book should contain all the specified knowlegde on earliest arsenal firearms and their accouterments, ca. 1320-1720, that I have amassed in 30 years. It would be the work of my life, so to speak. I't's all just hoping for the time being, though and I will have to work hard to make it real.

Well, it does not really require a "list" to let you know that my first (and only, up to now) book in 2005 was on fine Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque receptacles for precious goods. It's in German:

Michael Trömner: Behältnisse für Kostbares 1500-1700.

It does unfortunately not have an ISBN and is available directly from me. The price is 65 euro, postage included.

Anyone interested, please let me know.

I'll provide some information in a separate link.

Best,

Michael

Matchlock 21st December 2008 02:41 PM

For an extensive preview of my book, please go here:

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ted=1#post74584

Michael

Jim McDougall 22nd December 2008 03:41 AM

Michael, I know your book will be outstanding, and I'm glad that you are compiling what has become your life's work into print. I know that your wonderful sharing here of such amazing pieces and accompanying artwork has added tremendous dimension to the success of this forum, and we have been blessed to have your contributions here.

You have shared here incredible pieces of history that many of us would likely not have access to, as even many museums I dont believe display such comprehensive examples....and certainly not with such knowledgable guidance to go with them!!

You have definitely promoted our exposure to and understanding of rare early firearms, and reinforced the importance of period artwork in studying these. Godspeed on your work!!! but please do keep us posted, and stay in touch here OK!!!

All the very best,
Jim

M ELEY 27th December 2008 10:26 AM

Once again, Michael, you have left us envious and wanting!! In one of your pics, I see you have a nice piece of chain shot. Not to distract from this thread, but perhaps you could post a pic of this very rare type of naval ordenance, so I can seethe inside with envy even more!! :D

Matchlock 28th December 2008 02:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
Once again, Michael, you have left us envious and wanting!! In one of your pics, I see you have a nice piece of chain shot. Not to distract from this thread, but perhaps you could post a pic of this very rare type of naval ordenance, so I can seethe inside with envy even more!! :D


Hi, M Eley,

If you can be patient I will have pictures taken. My old camera won't do any more and I have not gone digital yet.

For the time being I have posted a pic of another 16th century chain shot taken at the reserve collection of the Fortress Hohensalzburg, Austria. Please see new thread.

Michael :)

M ELEY 2nd January 2009 05:27 AM

Thanks, Michael. Sorry, I was away from the Forum awhile, but appreciate the pics from the museum you sent. :)

Matchlock 5th January 2009 09:13 PM

Thank you, Mark. Your words are much appreciated.

Michael

Matchlock 4th May 2009 04:53 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Another interesting little wrought iron barrel, of early 15th century form, contrasted to a source of illustration of a baptismal font of similiar three ring reinforced shape, an illumination from a Prague manuscript of ca. 1420.

Michael

fernando 4th May 2009 05:17 PM

Hi Michael,
Is that what you call baptism of fire ? :eek: :rolleyes: :o

Now seriously ... great piece.

Fernando

Matchlock 4th May 2009 07:25 PM

Hi Fernando,

I can tell by your eloquence and love of puns (the latter shared between us) that you really appreciate the notion of a baptismal shower of flames as well as the smell of hellfire and sulphur! :) :D :rolleyes: :cool: :eek:

Michael

Matchlock 14th May 2009 05:38 PM

Multi Barreled 15th Century Guns
 
2 Attachment(s)
From:

Flavius Vegetius Renatus: Vier Bücher der Rytterschafft (Four books on knighthood), Erfurt, Germany, 1511.

That's what I meant when I wrote that not all of those little guys that are still around in such amazing numbers need to have been stocked individually as parts of portable handguns.

Michael

Matchlock 14th May 2009 05:39 PM

1 Attachment(s)
One more.

Matchlock 4th June 2009 01:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)
A multi barrel cannon cart, 1436.

Watercolor from Johann Hartlieb's book on warfare of 1436 (Austrian State Library, Vienna, cod. 3062).

Michel

fernando 4th June 2009 04:16 PM

What traction ? probably horses.
Wouln't we like to be the drivers? :eek:
Fernando

Matchlock 4th June 2009 04:50 PM

Hi Fernando,

Horses or probably oxen, I think.

Rather than just being the drivers I think we should choose to be the gun men on board! :eek: :cool:

Cheerio,

m

Spiridonov 8th April 2012 05:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
Another interesting little wrought iron barrel, of early 15th century form, contrasted to a source of illustration of a baptismal font of similiar three ring reinforced shape, an illumination from a Prague manuscript of ca. 1420.

Michael

Michael, I have a friend from Ryazan who practice in target shooting with replicas of 15 century handgonne. He'd really liked this handgonne and wants to make replica of this for target shooting. He often read our forum But he doesn't have an registration on vikingsword. So, he asked me to know the length, outside diameter and caliber of this handgonne. May You help me with this question?

Matchlock 8th April 2012 05:57 PM

Hi Alexender,

of course I can! ;)

The overall length is 11.4 cm, the (quite irregular) maximum outer diameter is 4.4 cm, and the bore is 14.86 mm. The diameter of the touch hole, again irregular as it was not bored but struck thru the white-hot iron with a hardened prick, is ca. 6 mm.

I'd like to see images of the replica!

Best,
Michael

Spiridonov 8th April 2012 06:54 PM

Thank You!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
I'd like to see images of the replica!

He said that he wants to :D He starting to make blueprints tomorrow

Matchlock 8th April 2012 08:15 PM

Please tell him to remember that the iron rings have to be forged separately, put on the barrel when white-warm and fire-forged!

m

Spiridonov 8th April 2012 08:31 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
Please tell him to remember that the iron rings have to be forged separately, put on the barrel when white-warm and be fire-forged!

m

He knows it

Matchlock 8th April 2012 08:54 PM

All the better!

m

Matchlock 14th March 2014 11:43 AM

1 Attachment(s)
This most remarkable device, probably made in the Thirty Years War and re-using short, older barrels, is called Sturmkolben or Igel in German, and I would be glad to know the English equivalent.
Such multi-barreled devices account for the wide presence of short 15th-16th c. barrels which were 'on the loose' again when the device was destroyed or given up.
Preserved in the Army Museum, Stockholm.


Best,
Michael

Matchlock 14th March 2014 12:06 PM

9 Attachment(s)
Similar samples in which older barrels are united are two 16th-17th c. Pechlanzen (pitch lances) in the Emden Armory.
The pitch incendiary mass was set afire and the lance was hurled by some sort of a catapult onto the shingled roofs of a besieged town where the delicate iron arrowheads got stuck, and the blazing tar/pitch would splatter around. Additionally, the short barrels are barbed for better contact with the roof shingles.
The saucer-like wooden plate at the bottom was meant to direct the splashing fire right onto the roof.

The measurements are:
overall length 2.25 m
width of the tar saucer 21 cm
weight 3.2 kg


I took these photos in 1987.


m


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