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-   -   Afghan Choora / Karud with stamps for I.D (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=23335)

Royston 5th November 2017 06:39 PM

Afghan Choora / Karud with stamps for I.D
 
4 Attachment(s)
I'm guessing it is an Afghan sharp pointy thing.

Well made with close fitting bone grips.

Quite small at only 30 cms long

What is unusual are the markings.

Any one know what they are ?

Broad arrow ( but upside down ) and crude Vicky crown ?
But what about the circle?
Regards
Roy

thinreadline 6th November 2017 10:39 PM

3 Attachment(s)
I am probably way off the mark here , but the circular mark with the concentric inner circle and central dot looks in imitation the base of a British 303 cartridge c/w with a poor go at imitating the markings found on them inc the 'II' of a Mk II cartridge . Above it looks very like an attempt to reproduce the British military inspection crown along with a broad arrow mark.

Royston 7th November 2017 10:09 PM

I had not considered a cartridge head but it certainly looks like one.
I agree about the crown and arrow, so perhaps it was just a local trying to "fit in"

Thanks
Roy

Sajen 7th November 2017 10:25 PM

Can't help with the markings, but it's a very nice Choora! :)

Jim McDougall 10th November 2017 05:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by thinreadline
I am probably way off the mark here , but the circular mark with the concentric inner circle and central dot looks in imitation the base of a British 303 cartridge c/w with a poor go at imitating the markings found on them inc the 'II' of a Mk II cartridge . Above it looks very like an attempt to reproduce the British military inspection crown along with a broad arrow mark.



Not at all off the mark! actually very astutely observed.
It makes perfect sense that the marks off a rifle cartridge would become part of the kinds of pastiche of marks often applied in weaponry produced by native artisans in Afghan regions. They have been copying British markings in this manner since around the middle of the 19th century, and many jezails have copied EIC balemarks and copied marks.

Interesting to see the artistic license in incorporating the broad arrow of the war department with the crown inspection mark.

These kinds of features to me really enhance the intrigue and dimension held in these weapons from probably Khyber regions, not necessarily in the Pass alone, but the vast areas surrounding and inhabited by the Waziri tribes these are often associated with.


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