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-   -   cocos island knives are back (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=23097)

ausjulius 4th September 2017 12:26 PM

cocos island knives are back
 
1 Attachment(s)
cocos island knives are back
i found this one form a recent auction in new zealand. and in fact there is another in an australian auction that looks like it might just be one as well
also in the 50s or 60s the cocos islands issued stamps with blacksmiths shown on the stamps . considering the agricultural nature of the plantation island there must have been busy that combined with the troops during the war..



we should really just call some office on the east island there and see if any of the local malays know who made this stuff
there is about 600 malays there so somebody should probably know immediately who the blacksmith family use to be.

ausjulius 4th September 2017 12:32 PM

sorry for those not familiar the cocos/keeling island golok or knife is the one in the top with a very distinct style. if you search cocos knife or keeling knife you should find more pics.

Sajen 4th September 2017 02:31 PM

Where is the picture? :)

Rick 4th September 2017 05:31 PM

Ausjulius, you need to upload your pictures directly to this site.

Thanks.

Ian 4th September 2017 09:04 PM

ausjulius:

There is a recent summary of what this site has to offer about the Keeling-Cocos knives here.

Ian

Ian 4th September 2017 09:59 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Photobucket now charges $400.00 for pics uploaded to their site to be hosted on third party servers! That is probably why the pic shown by ausjulius (I suspect one of mine) is showing that error message--I refuse to pay that amount simply to enable third party hosting which previously had been permitted free!

I have downloaded my pics from that site and post them directly here. The original thread that had these pics was posted more than a decade ago, before the policy on directly loading files to this site came into operation. All the more reason to have the pics posted here for future reference.

Ian.

ausjulius 4th September 2017 11:02 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Where is the picture? :)

hmm i did .. it vanished... ill try again should be up there no. thanks

Rich 4th September 2017 11:14 PM

Ian and all -

Try using Imgur as a photo posting site. Free.

Rich

ausjulius 4th September 2017 11:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Photobucket now charges $400.00 for pics uploaded to their site to be hosted on third party servers!


damn.. well no more photobucket for me.. that site was becoming so slow and nonfunctional that it s almost useless anyway.

these knives are really quite interesting you can see images and video footage of various clunies-ross wearing these as well.

the Malays there came some time in the 1860s i think before there was a mix if madagascan and south african coloured and Malay convicts...

they must have been contracted in a relatively compact group and brought their blacksmiths with them..

im just imagining some weird hybrid Madagascan or african weapons being made by a malay blacksmith.. or maybe a hybrid drik knife for the original clunies-ross heheh.

but really this is a mystery that i think we can solve with a few phone calls..
i think today im going to look in a phone directory for the cocos islands and make some calls there and see if any local people might know who were the makers of these and when they stopped making them!

Ian 5th September 2017 02:20 PM

ausjulius,

There may be a more dark explanation as to how Malay or Melanesian people ended up in the Cocos Keeling Islands in the 19th C. There was a practice in northern Australia of "blackbirding" native people of the Torres Strait Islands and nearby into forced labor on sugar plantations, etc. This was essentially a form of slavery. An ugly part of Australian history that also included indigenous groups (Aborigines).

I don't know the history of the Cocos Keeling Islands well enough to say whether the Malay inhabitants went there voluntarily or not, but the Clunies-Ross family ruled these islands with absolute authority before they became part of Australia.

Sajen 5th September 2017 04:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ausjulius
but really this is a mystery that i think we can solve with a few phone calls..
i think today im going to look in a phone directory for the cocos islands and make some calls there and see if any local people might know who were the makers of these and when they stopped making them!


I am more as curious if you will be able to get some informations! :)

Attached are my both honest examples.

Regards,
Detlef

ausjulius 7th September 2017 11:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
ausjulius,

There may be a more dark explanation as to how Malay or Melanesian people ended up in the Cocos Keeling Islands in the 19th C. There was a practice in northern Australia of "blackbirding" native people of the Torres Strait Islands and nearby into forced labor on sugar plantations, etc. This was essentially a form of slavery. An ugly part of Australian history that also included indigenous groups (Aborigines).

I don't know the history of the Cocos Keeling Islands well enough to say whether the Malay inhabitants went there voluntarily or not, but the Clunies-Ross family ruled these islands with absolute authority before they became part of Australia.

the history of the cocos is very well documented by its owners whose children are alive today... there was no melanesian people on these islands.. its nothing to do with blackbirding..

ausjulius 7th September 2017 11:14 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
I am more as curious if you will be able to get some informations! :)

Attached are my both honest examples.

Regards,
Detlef

thanks.. i didnt get to make a call today .tomorrow i shall do it..
they show up a lot so they must have made more than a few and for quite some time i suspect.

Sajen 7th September 2017 11:06 PM

Here a link for your interest: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocos_(Keeling)_Islands
It is IMVHO surprisingly that so much knives can be found by a rather small population. :shrug:


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