Ethnographic Arms & Armour

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-   -   Post Your Latest Acquisition here... (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1792)

Valjhun 1st February 2006 06:02 PM

Hi Galvano!

Killer Choora :eek: ! One of the nicest I've ever seen, and it seems quite big too. Is the blade wootz? Can you post some detailed photos of the blade?

Rich 1st February 2006 10:04 PM

"trench art" puukko
 
Just picked up a 1941 "trench art" Finnish puukko. Sheath made
from downed aircraft aluminum. Knife is commercial of the period.

http://home.earthlink.net/~steinpic/puukko.jpg

Rich

Andrew 2nd February 2006 04:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich
Just picked up a 1941 "trench art" Finnish puukko. Sheath made
from downed aircraft aluminum. Knife is commercial of the period.

http://home.earthlink.net/~steinpic/puukko.jpg

Rich



Interesting artwork on that scabbard, Rich. Looks like a grouping of various WWII military insignias? According to Google, "Muisto" is Finnish for "memory".

Have you come up with anything about this one? Very cool knife. :cool:

galvano 2nd February 2006 05:52 PM

choora
 
4 Attachment(s)
here details
the top of the blade
the hilt
guard
and the structure of the blade.it is not wootz is steel of bloomery furnace

Spunjer 2nd February 2006 10:27 PM

that's a nice lamination pattern..

kino 4th February 2006 01:50 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Not exactly new to me. I've had it for a few years now.

Moro Kris with a Kemoh kakatua.

Spunjer 4th February 2006 03:49 AM

hey kino, long time no hear from you! thanks for showing us one of your collection. btw, what's a 'Kemoh'? salamat...

kino 4th February 2006 01:18 PM

Howzit Spunger, Kemoh is the giant clam (Tridacna). The Kakatua is carved from the shell of the giant clam. I don't know of a Pilipino term for it. Kemoh, is what the Indo/Malays (?) calls it.
Just wondering if there are other Moro weapons with Kemoh hilts out there. Giant clams were plentyful back in the day. We had a few for yard decor.

Go Seahawks............

punal 4th February 2006 05:19 PM

2 Attachment(s)
My very latest.

Spunjer 4th February 2006 11:58 PM

punal,

wow! your collection seems to be growing fast! really like the silver kakatua...


kino,

howzit, brah! mahalo for sharing that rare with us that rare hilt. hopefully some of the more senior collectors can chime in on this...

Montino Bourbon 8th February 2006 11:48 PM

My birthday gift...
 
3 Attachment(s)
To myself!

It was on hold; when the hold disappeared, right on my birthday, I knew that 'it is written' that I was the new owner.

Talk about intense! It's the kind of thing that you can feel the vibration. This is definitely a pusaka.

Oh, and don't ask how old I turned; let's just say that if you know the Beatle's 'Sergeant Pepper' you already know.

Montino Bourbon 8th February 2006 11:50 PM

Shoot! I must have done something wrong...
 
tell me if you can see the pic's, please.

Rick 9th February 2006 01:22 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Hi Montino , I can see them although it's a strange format to post pictures . Mostly we use the jpg format and upload them to the site .

Let me introduce you to your pusaka's brother .. ;) :D

Montino Bourbon 9th February 2006 01:32 PM

better pictures
 
3 Attachment(s)
Here's jpegs... and I want to have details on the sheath, since I have to make one.

Congratulations! is the handle rhino horn?

Andy Davis 9th February 2006 02:11 PM

OK so its not so new a Dha
 
4 Attachment(s)
Hi all
Well actually this is my oldest piece. That is, the first serious weapon I bought and still one of my favourites and not seen on this forum or anywhere else too often.
A Dha with a clipped 2 blade I think we called it.
Did put it in about 2 years ago but nice to rephoto it, give it a polish and show it again. Awsome bit of blade construction in my opinion but the photos dont really show the changes in width and angles too well. Take my word for it then. Its good ;)
Cheers
Andy

Robert 10th February 2006 06:42 PM

My Latest Dagger
 
3 Attachment(s)
This is the latest addition to my collection. The age I believe to be late 19th to mid 20th century. Grip is horn with brass fittings. The blade is double beveled on one side only, the other side is flat. Both edges are sharpened from the decorative filing to the tip. The sheath was described as being either sheep or goat skin but it is paper thin which I have never seen before. It has shrunken so badly over the years and is so brittle that it is almost useless. As usual I would appreciate any comments or information you would like to give on this item, especially on the care and preservation of the sheath. Thank you.


Blade 12-3/4" in length
Blade 1-3/16" wide at hilt
Blade 3/16" thick at hilt
Hilt 4-3/4" in length
Guard 2-7/16" wide


Robert

Panton 10th February 2006 08:15 PM

...gaucho knife, once again without a sheath.....will I ever own a complete piece?
But then.....nice vintage filework.

Robert 12th February 2006 06:53 PM

Greetings Panton and welcome to the forum. I was thinking with the decorations on the blade and the overall design of this dagger that it was more likely from the Philippines than South America. It does show a great deal of Spanish influence in its design but I have never seen a gaucho knife of this style before. Do you by chance have any reference to ones of this style? I would really be interested in seeing them. What really puzzles me is what the scabbard is made. Would anyone else care to make any comments on the dagger or scabbard?


Robert

ariel 12th February 2006 08:12 PM

Nice Karud!
Artzi mentioned several times on this Forum that the way rhino-horn was cut for this particular handle indicates Bukharan origin. Am I quoting him correctly?
The blade is wonderful: real wootz, intact, elegant.
A wet dream of a knife..... :cool:

Luc LEFEBVRE 12th February 2006 08:46 PM

Gbaya, Ngbaka, Ngombe, throwing knife CONGO
 
5 Attachment(s)
The last I bought, throwing knife from the Gbaya, Ngbaka, Ngombe, tribes of the north of Congo.
XIXth
44cm height, 35cm width.

kino 12th February 2006 11:57 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Picked up this, bling wearing kid, yesterday. On the hilt side of the wooden
handguard is a veneer of horn, under the horn is a round piece of cloth.

Spunjer 13th February 2006 01:24 PM

holy fo-shizzle! nice silver work on that tenegre. with a dated coin at that... i wonder if that's the year it was made? did it came with the scabbard? regardless, nice acquisition, kino..

kino 13th February 2006 11:32 PM

Spunger, No scabbard. I don't think the bolo was made on the same date
that on the coin. Maybe late 19th, early 20th Cent.

Battara 14th February 2006 12:51 AM

I'm with Spunger, beautiful silver work and craftsmanship on the tenegre (grumble, grumble, envy, envy....).

M ELEY 14th February 2006 08:45 AM

Colonial fur-trade spike axe/tomahawk
 
Ebay item #6251660306. Got it for a steal (money is tight right now, but I couldn't resist a bargain!). These true tomahawk axes (the weapon/tools of ealy America) were just as real as the so-called trade pipe tomahawks. Used by soldiers, frontiersmen and Indians, they are very misunderstood and so bargains can still be found. This one dates to 1790-1840 (height of the fur trade) and the "nail pulling slot" is actually a beaver trap chain pull (squared off cut). Although not ethnographic in the classic sense, still unusual enough to be of interest and an important part of istory...

Titus Pullo 14th February 2006 09:07 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Davis
Hi all
Well actually this is my oldest piece. That is, the first serious weapon I bought and still one of my favourites and not seen on this forum or anywhere else too often.
A Dha with a clipped 2 blade I think we called it.
Did put it in about 2 years ago but nice to rephoto it, give it a polish and show it again. Awsome bit of blade construction in my opinion but the photos dont really show the changes in width and angles too well. Take my word for it then. Its good ;)
Cheers
Andy


It's very crude, but very affective weapons, nonetheless! I read that the Thais, and other Tai speaking people, which include the Laotion, Shan, and some group living in southern China and Vietnam, are originally from the Southern Southeast Asia and the Islands around there. It is believe the ancestors of the Tai people are very much like the Daic people, who actually might be the more ancient group of Tai speaking people; they live on Borneo, Northern Phillipines, and other parts the South. They then reimmigrated back to the mainland Asia and then spread southward into Southeast Asia. There is a smiliarity between the Tai and Daic people's language. Also, If you look at the way these people fight, they also like to fight with machetes, which ofcourse are similar to the Thai and Shan machete like swords.

"No guts...no glory!"

kino 26th March 2006 01:16 AM

Yataghan
 
4 Attachment(s)
Picked this one up at the Gun Show. The seller had it on his table for over a year. I couldn't pass it up after he asked me to name my price. Has some damage with rusted blade, but it still retains its beauty. Where is this Yataghan from.

kino 26th March 2006 01:22 AM

4 Attachment(s)
Three more from todays gun show excursion. One in need of dental repair. The silver Kakatua has damage and the blade is sporting some nicks.

ibeam 26th March 2006 07:41 AM

Great Pieces.

Share some pix when you clean them up and back from the DENTIST. ;)

Spunjer 26th March 2006 03:36 PM

Quote:
One in need of dental repair....




hey, he reminds me of mang isko, the drunk that used to hung around nanay pacing's carenderia, LOL...


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