Ethnographic Arms & Armour

Ethnographic Arms & Armour (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/index.php)
-   European Armoury (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=12)
-   -   German Medieval Arms and Armor in the Museum of Varna, Bulgaria (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=11958)

Matchlock 16th May 2010 06:02 PM

German Medieval Arms and Armor in the Museum of Varna, Bulgaria
 
12 Attachment(s)
The owner's logo is seen in most images (from the web).

Among others a German Gothic crossbow with composite bow, mid to 2nd half of the 15th century,
German medieval swords, 14th to late 15th century,
a Historismus suit of Gothic man and horse armor, in the style of ca. 1480, late 19th century;
and three German haquebut barrels:
- the one on top of cast copper alloy (bronze), ca. 1470-80,
- the lower two of wrought iron and probably of Bohemian type, ca. 1440-60 and of quite unusual simple form in that they do not have the characteristic swamped muzzle heads.

Sorry, no measurements provided.

Enjoy.

Best,
Michael

Samik 17th May 2010 07:23 PM

Thank you for the pictures Matchlock!



Would you happen to have more info on that picture?

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/attac...tid=58105&stc=1

The schiavonesca style sabre and the hand-n-a half sword seems more Hungarian than German to me (the cross-guard is of the Veneto-Balkan origin used also used in the Kingdom of Hungary, but what sets it apart is the squarish shield-like pommel whereas in the Balkans and Venice the "cats head"/katzenkoppf style was in use) but as always feel free to correct me in case I'm wrong :)

Regards,
Samuel

Matchlock 17th May 2010 07:53 PM

Hi Samuel,

Thank you so much for your clarifying notes! As you see I just tried to give a short overview specifying only a bit on my main subject, the haquebut barrels. ;)

Of course you are perfectly right about the two late 15th century swords: the saber is most probably of Hungarian production, with the pommel showing a clear Venetian stylistic influence. The broadsword next to the saber is a characteristic piece of Venice type, datable to ca. 1475-1490.

Thanks again and best wishes,
Michael

TVV 17th May 2010 08:27 PM

Based on my memories from my visit to the Vladisalv of Varna Museum, the haqebuts were attributed to Bohemians in the Polish Army, who according to the chronicle remained at the battlefield after the rest of the Christian forces were routed and defended a wagenburg successfully against repeated sipahi attacks for a while, until they were eventually overwhelmed.

I believe the kettle helmet and some of the swords were actual finds from the site of the battle, which is exactly where the museum and the little park around it currently stand.

Regards,
Teodor

Matchlock 17th May 2010 10:18 PM

Thanks a lot, Teodor, :) ;)

So my theory on the Bohemian origin of the wrought iron haquebuts has been confirmed! I am very glad not to have made a mistake. :cool: :eek:

Best,
Michael

Samik 17th May 2010 11:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
Hi Samuel,

Thank you so much for your clarifying notes! As you see I just tried to give a short overview specifying only a bit on my main subject, the haquebut barrels. ;)

Of course you are perfectly right about the two late 15th century swords: the saber is most probably of Hungarian production, with the pommel showing a clear Venetian stylistic influence. The broadsword next to the saber is a characteristic piece of Venice type, datable to ca. 1475-1490.

Thanks again and best wishes,
Michael



Thanks for reply Michael, they're sure a nice piece of work !


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:40 AM.

Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.