Ethnographic Arms & Armour

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-   -   Dha for comment (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=26390)

JeffS 15th October 2020 05:53 PM

Dha for comment
 
4 Attachment(s)
Just picked this up off Ebay. It has an interesting mix of design features such as the hairpin blade, silver work, and strange jagged carving on the shoulder-carry open-scabbard. Photos are from the Ebay sell page.

kai 15th October 2020 08:21 PM

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=19472

Sajen 15th October 2020 08:36 PM

Hi Jeff,

Would agree with Kai, look like you have got a nice Achang HuSa dao! ;)

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...&highlight=husa

Regards,
Detlef

Ian 16th October 2020 01:26 AM

Hi Jeff,

While the maker of this blade is most likely from Yunnan, the customer was probably some distance from the HuSa homeland. There are Achang living in northern Burma/Assam. These long-bladed, straight, square-ended dha/dao are most commonly found in Assam and north-west Yunnan. The most common group in Yunnan to use this type pf sword are the Lisu (who are related ethnically to the Kachin). Scabbards are typically open-faced, and the toe projects well beyond the end of the blade.

You have found a nice example. The hilt looks to be Shan in style, and there is a close relationship between the Shan and Achang in south-western Yunnan.

Ian.

JeffS 16th October 2020 05:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Hi Jeff,

Would agree with Kai, look like you have got a nice Achang HuSa dao! ;)

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...&highlight=husa

Regards,
Detlef


Very cool sword. Do I understand correctly that Robert did the silver restoration work on the scabbard?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Hi Jeff,

While the maker of this blade is most likely from Yunnan, the customer was probably some distance from the HuSa homeland. There are Achang living in northern Burma/Assam. These long-bladed, straight, square-ended dha/dao are most commonly found in Assam and north-west Yunnan. The most common group in Yunnan to use this type pf sword are the Lisu (who are related ethnically to the Kachin). Scabbards are typically open-faced, and the toe projects well beyond the end of the blade.

You have found a nice example. The hilt looks to be Shan in style, and there is a close relationship between the Shan and Achang in south-western Yunnan.

Ian.


Thanks Ian. Great info.

Sajen 17th October 2020 01:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffS
Very cool sword. Do I understand correctly that Robert did the silver restoration work on the scabbard?


Hi Jeff,

Thank you! :) Yes, Robert did the restoration of the scabbard and worked the fittings new from brass, they are silver washed.

Regards,
Detlef

gp 17th October 2020 06:19 PM

silly question perhaps but why are these weapons not pointed ?
From an attacking perspective you lose one functionality I would say..
and it would require more force to thrust it into an opponent's body...

Ian 18th October 2020 02:14 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gp
silly question perhaps but why are these weapons not pointed ?
From an attacking perspective you lose one functionality I would say..
and it would require more force to thrust it into an opponent's body...
History and tradition. Many of these weapons were adapted from tools used mainly for chopping. The resulting swords were either a combination tool/weapon or weapons based on tools. Some Mainland SE Asian swords are indeed pointed, such as most Burmese and Shan dha, and Thai/Lao daab. These were used for both slashing and stabbing, although slashing was probably used more commonly against lightly armored opponents.

JeffS 18th October 2020 02:35 PM

Regarding the tool origin. I did some field work a few year back in northern Myanmar. The Kachin (Rowang) with us had small working daos (made from blanks purchased in Putao market). The lower corner of the squared tip provides a vertical aligned point that they frequently used to to "spear" and pick up chunks of firewood with an easy downward chopping motion. A useful feature for a general purpose tool.

JeffS 24th October 2020 08:32 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Any thoughts on what was set in the two round depressions on the scabbard foot? There is a gummy resin at the bottom that was likely the adhesive used. One of these has shiny foil-like residue stuck to the resin.
Incidentally I found another example of this scabbard style on Ashoka Arts website.


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