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-   -   17thC Horsemanís hammer (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=25096)

Victrix 3rd July 2019 01:06 PM

17thC Horsemanís hammer
 
4 Attachment(s)
Hi,
This object was described as a 17thC Eastern European horsemanís hammer (Reiterhammer) in an auction. I think itís most likely Hungarian. The wooden haft is obviously a modern replacement. The distance from hammer front to end of parrotís beak is just under 18cm, which size supports the idea that it was meant for use in mounted combat. Interesting features include ĒfullersĒ in the parrotís beak and a ĒswellingĒ for additional strengthening behind the hammer. Signs of wear at both ends indicate that the hammer has seen fairly frequent use. The shine on the metal indicate good quality steel. There are latten (brass) inlay patterns on the metal. I think there was originally also a now missing small cylinder cap part to cover the top.

Any comments or insights are welcome. Is it difficult to make latten (brass) inlays, and does this indicate that the hammer likely belonged to an officer?

fernando 3rd July 2019 01:34 PM

Magnificent; a superb piece for an arms collector :cool:.
... and if i may ...
Te pros:
Maybe even earlier ?
For a high rank owner ? most surely, with those inlays.
The cons:
That screw ... not a modern thing?
Fairly frequent use; most often not from combat but vandalized by adults, using it as an ordinary tool, or kids playing hard around with it ... but you know that.
Sorry for the skepticism ... and ignorance :o .

Victrix 3rd July 2019 02:25 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Magnificent; a superb piece for an arms collector :cool:.
... and if i may ...
Te pros:
Maybe even earlier ?
For a high rank owner ? most surely, with those inlays.
The cons:
That screw ... not a modern thing?
Fairly frequent use; most often not from combat but vandalized by adults, using it as an ordinary tool, or kids playing hard around with it ... but you know that.
Sorry for the skepticism ... and ignorance :o .


Always healthy with some skepticism, Fernando! I like to collect with eyes wide open. But I like the history behind the objects and welcome signs of wear and resigned to the inevitability of some parts replaced. The screw may be modern to secure the head to the new wooden haft. It canít be ruled out that the object has been used as a tool more recently, but I sincerely hope no kids used it to bash on each other :eek: These were notoriously dangerous weapons, which injuries often had very grave consequences.

bvieira 3rd July 2019 02:26 PM

Hello,


For me it is Hungarian and original 17th century, I think that the salience that can be seen when taking a photo from the bottom up is typical and the german warhammers do not have it, unfortunately it is in very bad condition in the tip what makes it value less, but this is just my humble opinion there more much knowledge experts here.

regards,

BV

fernando 3rd July 2019 03:43 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Victrix, let me (still) play the fool ...
Have you observed the variations of these Polish/Hungarian hammers (Nadziak?) out there in the web ?
One recurrent style most similar to your example, suggests an extension of the langets in the opposite (top) direction, holding to some 'cylindrical' projection.
Could it be that yours has once, even in the period ... surely not :o


.

Victrix 3rd July 2019 04:13 PM

Fernando, the photo you posted is of a Polish war hammer I believe, some of which had a protrusion at the top and hence the langet (some could even be used as walking sticks!). I have not seen those protrusions on Hungarian war hammers. But I suspect that my warhammer once had a shallow cap/cup that fitted at the top. The region has great variation in styles so I think itís futile to be too specific.

fernando 3rd July 2019 05:10 PM

Duly noted; you know, i was trying to point out some discrepancies, so that you would feel like getting rid of it ... in my direction ;) .

Victrix 3rd July 2019 05:17 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvieira
Hello,


For me it is Hungarian and original 17th century, I think that the salience that can be seen when taking a photo from the bottom up is typical and the german warhammers do not have it, unfortunately it is in very bad condition in the tip what makes it value less, but this is just my humble opinion there more much knowledge experts here.

regards,

BV


BV, by salience are you referring to the swelling just before the hammer head (not sure what you mean by bottom up)? The tip has certainly struck something hard a few times (!). I acquired this item because of its beauty and relatively modest price, and it fits my display.

Hereís a pic from below just in case. This is a serious piece of kit. Not just something to pose with. The blunt side was to crush and stun. The peaked end was to penetrate something hard (think can opener). I think I will put some mineral oil on it just in case so it deosnít rust.

Many thanks.

Victrix 3rd July 2019 05:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Duly noted; you know, i was trying to point out some discrepancies, so that you would feel like getting rid of it ... in my direction ;) .


:D :D :D

BUCC_Guy 4th July 2019 05:42 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Looks good, certainly strikes me as Polish/Hungarian.

This is a hammer advertised as 16th c. Polish... only the head appears to be original. I have no idea how you could get a replacement cap, but this is what mine looks like.

Victrix 4th July 2019 01:26 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUCC_Guy
Looks good, certainly strikes me as Polish/Hungarian.

This is a hammer advertised as 16th c. Polish... only the head appears to be original. I have no idea how you could get a replacement cap, but this is what mine looks like.


I think yours is a version with an axe blade at one side and the hammer on the other? I think the Poles call them czekan and the Hungarians fokos. There are so many different versions. Generally it seems the names suggest Turkish origins (via Hungary) for these weapons. You can read more about them here: https://polisharms.com/warhammers/.

Iím quite happy with my Horsemanís hammer as it is without the top cap. Itís exactly what I wanted for my display.

Many thanks.


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