Ethnographic Arms & Armour

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weapons 27 7th December 2012 10:32 AM

sword for id
 
10 Attachment(s)
could identify you this sword
It measures 1.01 m long, 87 cm and 4 cm wide blade
the markings on the Russian air or?

M ELEY 7th December 2012 11:50 AM

Hussars? Polish? Nice sword- On to the experts...

weapons 27 10th December 2012 05:34 PM

specialists not ideas?

Martin Lubojacky 10th December 2012 08:15 PM

There is Austrian eagle on the blade, but alltogether the sword looks strange. Some Austrian sabres used to employ cros-shaped cossguard with poppy-heads et ends, but they were different...

Martin Lubojacky 10th December 2012 08:29 PM

The width 4 cms shows that the blade could eventually be from the "Sabre of Austrian Light Cavalry model 1768". Isnīt there inscription "Pottenstein" on back ?

Glaive203 11th December 2012 02:16 AM

the handle could be polish http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/images/philts.jpg

But it could equally be Russian or Austrian http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/ima...Handlechart.jpg

Illustrations from Wojciech Zablocki "Ciecia Prawdziwa Szabla"

weapons 27 11th December 2012 04:31 AM

hi martin
non-no inscriptions on the top of the blade..

Glaive203 11th December 2012 07:51 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Lubojacky
There is Austrian eagle on the blade, but alltogether the sword looks strange. Some Austrian sabres used to employ cros-shaped cossguard with poppy-heads et ends, but they were different...


Martin why do you think this is an Hapburg eagle. The double headed eagle was Byzantine in origin and was used equally by the Austrians, Poles and Russians as a symbol?

Martin Lubojacky 11th December 2012 12:19 PM

You are true, I was agog, awaiting this question. Till now I only saw it on blades assigned to Austrian sabres from 18th century- on the other side each engraving (always on this Austrian blades/sabres - you can find it in catalogues of Austrian cold weapons) was different - once keeping pome and truncheon, once nothing, than sword and pome..... I think this is question for experts, who are still silent......

Jim McDougall 11th December 2012 09:46 PM

While awaiting words from the silent experts, I would just add that I am inclined to see this as most likely an Austrian sabre not for cavalry but infantry or other units officers. The absence of knuckleguard seems to disagree with most cavalry sabres of Austria, Hungary and Poland of the 18th century which this seems. The hatchet point blade is indeed very much like the cavalry sabres of those times. The double head eagle and crown is strikingly similar to one seen on an Austrian heavy cavalry sword 1769-75 (Wagner, 1, plate 13).
The backstrap fluting and brass hilt seems corroborated by other sabres of these countries in these times and the quillon terminals resemble some on Hungarian sabres. I do not have my Eastern European sources with me, so hopefully the experts will chime in.
Nice sabre, these are always most desirable and with colorful history.


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