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Author Topic:   Talibon or not to talibon?
Conogre
Senior Member
posted 10-12-2002 19:21     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi guys.....just picked up a piece off E-bay that has me a little curious.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=721241628
While the blade looks like a talibon, the hilt seems way wrong for the type, part of what caught my eye in the first place.
Sorry, the pics are bad on the auction but comments would be appreciated.....I'll have to wait for it's arrival, of course for final determination, but that hilt has been bugging me since I first saw it.

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zelbone
Senior Member
posted 10-12-2002 21:20     Click Here to See the Profile for zelbone   Click Here to Email zelbone     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mike, I wouldn't worry too much about that hilt. It definately is a talibon. You'll find a wide variety of different hilts for the talibon, which is a Visayan weapon. There are several different islands in the Visayas with different cultures and pinpointing a specific hilt style with a certain group would be difficult. Judging just from the photos, it appears that your knife is a actually a working talibon and not one made as a souvenir for a GI. The hilt actually looks like it takes stylistic cues from Mindanao...I see some similarities to Yakan Moro hilts and Mandaya bolo hilts. This really isn't surprising since there is a large Visayan community in Mindanao. If you like, I could post pics of various talibon hilts for comparison.

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VANDOO
Senior Member
posted 10-12-2002 22:23     Click Here to See the Profile for VANDOO   Click Here to Email VANDOO     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
ZELBONE GO AHEAD AND POST SOME PICTURES OF VARIOUS HILTS AND SCABBARD DESIGNS AND I WILL ADD SOME PICTURES OF MINE ALSO,I HAVE BEEN MEANING TO DO IT FOR QUITE A WHILE AND THIS SEEMS LIKE A GOOD TIME TO DO IT. THERE IS A GREAT DEAL OF VARIATION IN THE HILTS AND SCABBARDS ON THEM DUE TO AREA AND AGE SOME OF THE OLD CATALOGS USED TO CALL THEM GOLOCKS. THE BLADE SHAPE SEEMS TO REMAIN CONSISTANT ON ALL OF THEM FROM THE OLD ONES TO THE WW2 SOUVINEERS.THEY DO RANGE IN SIZE FROM SHORT SWORD TO DAGGER SIZES AND ALL I HAVE SEEN WERE WORKING KNIVES ALTHOUGH SOME ARE PRETTY NICELY CARVED AND SOME OF THE SOUVINEERS ARE INLAYED WITH M.O.P.

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Ian
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posted 10-12-2002 22:56     Click Here to See the Profile for Ian   Click Here to Email Ian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Zel and Vandoo. There is tremendous variation in the hilts and scabbards of these weapons and it would be good to see what others have found over the years. I'll post a bunch of pictures too.

Received from Ian:

The following are knives of the talibon variety. The top four share a common style of hilt which appears to be based on a floral design. The bottom four share a different shape, resembling perhaps the head of a bird.





The following are sword length talibon. The top one appears to be quite old, perhaps late 19th C. The others are mor recent.



Received from Lew via Ian:

[This message has been edited by Lee Jones (edited 10-13-2002).]

[This message has been edited by Ian (edited 10-14-2002).]

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Conogre
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posted 10-13-2002 10:41     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks guys, your assistance is appreciated.
While there is tremendous variation in so many types of weapons, the talibon seems as unique as a kukhri in blade style, yet with myriad hilt styles...this one looked distinctly Mandaya to me.
Actually, talibons on the whole seem extremely under-rated to me, especially in the larger sizes, so photos would be appreciated.

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Federico
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posted 10-13-2002 20:32     Click Here to See the Profile for Federico   Click Here to Email Federico     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The "talibon" is an interesting weapon, that has always piqued my curiousity. My own family lines runs as so, my father is Waray (Waray inhabit the islands of Leyte and Samar in Visayas), and my mother is Tagalog (from the province of Nueva Ecija). Neither are familiar with the word talibon. Ive also spoken with Illocanos, and Cebuanos again none weree familiar with the name "talibon". But with my Illocano cousin, he does say the blade style is what is used in Pampanga, and that it is a pampangan knife and not Visayan. In krieger's plates he notes the "talibon" being from Visayas, but instead of talibon he calls it the Visayan Pira. In Stone's he calls it the talibon. So whose name is correct, makes me wonder. I would feel more comfortable with the term talibon if I could meet an old Filipino who see the knife and calls it a talibon, instead of scratching his head and laughing.

Anyways back to the knife style, Ive seen examples as provinanced from being from other places than Visayas. Including some similar work knives in pictures from Mindannao. However, like most of the knives we see, these pictures and knives were all post WWII. After WWII in PI there have been heavy migrations of people, which brings the question, is this just a similar work knife found in different regions, or the results of migrant Filipinos bring their style knife from one region to another.

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zelbone
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posted 10-13-2002 21:07     Click Here to See the Profile for zelbone   Click Here to Email zelbone     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's interesting, Federico. An old aunt of mine from Panay saw my collection awhile back and referred to my "Diety" or "Monster" hilt Visayan swords as talibons. I've always drew a distinction between the two sword types and referred to the "diety-monster head" types as tenegres or binagons. When I showed her my old talibon, she said that is the style found on Cebu and Leyte. I've also heard of the little talibon called by Pampangans and others as a "palembko" or "plamenko." I think what we have here is dialectal differences when referring to the same sword style. This isn't surprising with the hundreds of dialects in the Philippines. The term "talibon" was probably used by the Spanish to make it less confusing for them, just as the term "bolo" was used for any short sword from the Philippines.

I'll send a variety of "talibon" pics to Lee for posting. They range from the WWII bringbacks to a really old early to mid 19th C. example with a heavy blade unlike the more crescent shaped variety. The blade is heavy, thick, and finely laminated, but it doesn't show in the pics. A collector friend of mine who's also an escrimador says that the older crescent-shaped fighting style used by the Pulajan (I have yet to find references to who the Pulajan were) must have an angled hilt, sufficient blade weight, and have a "thunb-groove" or area behind the back of the blade to rest your thumb.



Talibons in scabbards



Talibon hilts



Tiny talibon with old talibon



Big and small talibon



Small WWII era talibons



Small WWII era talibon hilt variations

[This message has been edited by Lee Jones (edited 10-14-2002).]

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Conogre
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posted 10-13-2002 21:39     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Now THIS is getting more and more interesting. I've heard there's a similar styled blade in Indonesia, while I've got an older one that has a monster hilt and a similar blade shape, only straight and with a clipped point that I THINK is Visayan.
I notice two of Ian's have angular carving more indicative of Moro/T'boli pieces, and the center one of Lew's with the "bamboo" shaped hilt is unlike anything I've ever seen (also with a slightly different blade shape, unless I'm mistaken)
By the way, another thing that made me bid on that old Ebay version is that the blade looks like it might be very heavily lamilar, somewhat unusual from those I've seen, but again, that might just be optical illusion.
No doubt about it, just from those already posted the "talibon" /golok/bolo is definitely sometimes under-rated.

[This message has been edited by Conogre (edited 10-13-2002).]

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VANDOO
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posted 10-14-2002 15:51     Click Here to See the Profile for VANDOO   Click Here to Email VANDOO     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
IAN A VERY NICE SELECTION OF TALBIONS. I HAVE SENT SOME PICTURES OF MINE TO LEE TO POST. ONE OF MINE HAS A ROOSTER HEAD POMMEL AND A AIRPLANE CARVED ON THE SCABBARD. ANOTHER HAS A SCALY MONSTER HEAD WITH OPEN MOUTH FOR A HANDLE ANOTHER HAS A TIGERS HEAD WITH A MANS HEAD IN ITS MOUTH, THE LAST ONE HAS A MANS HEAD. THE CARVEING IS VERY GOOD AND YOU CAN SEE THE MANS FACE VERY WELL UNFORTUNATELY MY CAMERA WON'T TAKE GOOD ENOUGH PICTURES TO SHOW THIS CLEARLY. THERE IS QUITE A VARIATION ON THE OTHERS ONE EVEN HAS A NUDE WOMAN ON THE SCABBARD. ALL BUT ONE HAVE WOOD HANDLES AND ONE IS WATER BUFFALOW HORN. THE RANGE IN SIZES ON MINE GO FROM AROUND 10 INCHES TO A LITTLE OVER TWO FEET. I THINK THE OLD TRADITIONAL HANDLE IS LIKE THE LARGE ONE WITH THE MORO SCABBARD IN MY LAST PICTURE THERE IS ALSO A PICTURE OF IT IN MY VANDOO'S MORO SWORD POSTS.






[This message has been edited by Lee Jones (edited 10-14-2002).]

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Lee Jones
EEWRS Staff
posted 10-14-2002 18:39     Click Here to See the Profile for Lee Jones   Click Here to Email Lee Jones     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
talibon pictures from Vandoo, continued



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M ELEY
Senior Member
posted 10-14-2002 20:32     Click Here to See the Profile for M ELEY     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
WOW,VANDOO! Very nice pieces! I especially like the carved tiger hilt on the one piece. I've seen goloks and klewangs with carved faces and clenched fists, but have never seen them on talibon. I'd always assumed that to fit the classification of talibon, they had to have the characteristic phallic hilt shape. I've sometimes heard mention that these were predominantly used by the Christian Moros...is this true?

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VANDOO
Senior Member
posted 10-14-2002 20:49     Click Here to See the Profile for VANDOO   Click Here to Email VANDOO     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
IT IS MY UNDERSTANDING THAT THEY ARE USED BY THE CHRISTIAN TRIBES AND MAY HAVE BEEN THE TRADITIONAL KNIFE FORM, EVEN BEFORE CHRISTIANITY ARRIVED. THE MORO'S ARE MOSLEM AND SOME OF THE CHARISTICS OF THEIR WEAPONS MAY HAVE DERIVED FROM THE ORIGINAL PAGAN WEAPONS FORMS AND BECAME MODIFIED DUE TO ISLAM. THE MORO'S PROBABLY CAPTURED WEAPONS FROM THE CHRISTIAN TRIBES DURING SLAVE RAIDS AND THE CHRISTIANS MAY ALSO HAVE AQUIRED A FEW MORO WEAPONS DURING THESE CONFLICTS. I SUSPECT THAT MOST OF THE VARIATIONS ARE MORE RECENT DUE TO ALL THE FOREIGN INFLUENCE ESPECIALLY DURING WW2. IN THE COUNTRY SIDE I HAVE SEEN THE COMMON TALBION STILL BEING CARRIED ON LUZON AS EVERYONE HAD A WORK KNIFE. THE ONES IN MORO HANDS WOULD MOST LIKELY HAVE BEEN WAR BOOTY. WOW WE NOW HAVE QUITE A GALLERY OF TALBIONS, DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY OTHERS TO ADD TO THE POST? THANKS TO ALL FOR SHAREING.

[This message has been edited by VANDOO (edited 10-14-2002).]

[This message has been edited by VANDOO (edited 10-14-2002).]

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zelbone
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posted 10-15-2002 10:53     Click Here to See the Profile for zelbone   Click Here to Email zelbone     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
EXCELLENT variety of talibons, VANDOO! I especially like the hilt with the tigers head with a man's head in its mouth. That motif is very old and I've seen it on other Filipino sword types as well. I must admit, though, my favorite scabbard of yours is the one with the carved naked lady !!!

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Conogre
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posted 10-15-2002 11:37     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
LOL!! It looks like your lady is going to amass a following.....I take it you noticed the hilt pommel carving also? Truly unique.
In all seriousness, this is truly a magnificent display of a specific weapons type.....I'll send along a pic of my clip point variant to Lee also.
Zelbone's reference to the Pulajan has me intruiged...has anyone else heard of such?
Thank you one and all.

[This message has been edited by Conogre (edited 10-15-2002).]

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MABAGANI
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posted 10-15-2002 13:12     Click Here to See the Profile for MABAGANI     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The name Talibon was coined as a catchall for this form by early collectors. If I recall Talibon is used in Cebu, but as mentioned other regions use different names.

In Samar/Leyte the short cresent shaped sword was used by the Pulajan, a Christian warrior cult, named for their red trousers, pulajan, the color red.
Long dark martial history in the the FilAm War starting from Balangiga, Samar 1901 into 1926. Other than articles by scholars, there is Vic Hurley's book "Jungle Patrol" which covers many of the Pulajan battles, also "Bullets and Bolos" by White, "Muddy Glory" by Roth.


[This message has been edited by MABAGANI (edited 10-15-2002).]

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Federico
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posted 10-15-2002 15:57     Click Here to See the Profile for Federico   Click Here to Email Federico     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looking at all the pics of the "talibons" makes me wonder how much variation there is, and if we are lumping in different knives together under a catch-all name. Eg. boloizing the term talibon. From blade shape, to hilt shape, to scabbard form, Im sure we all noticed the variant. And then also, there is the question, is the talibon form a universal island form or is it being found on different islands due to migrating Visayans bringing their weaponry with them. I believe I have said this before, but after WWII, there was (still is) marked population shifts in PI, with people moving all over the place looking for greener pastures. So it is not unreasonable to think that these migrating people, would bring their weaponry with them. As for what my Waray relatives called swords, it was sundang (not sure though what they would call sundang).

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Conogre
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posted 10-15-2002 23:56     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While I think about it, I'm still slowly amassing photos of ethnic weapons for a proposed CD pictorial identifier/dictionary.
Since so many members have joined since I originally asked, are there any who would object to their photos being used as long as credit is given?
Of course, this has become MUCH slower since some members with a "few pieces" tucked away started posting photos (why do Ian and Barry immediately come to mind?)

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Andrew
EEWRS Staff
posted 10-16-2002 00:23     Click Here to See the Profile for Andrew   Click Here to Email Andrew     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds like a great idea, Mike. Count me in, in the unlikely event I post anything interesting.

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VANDOO
Senior Member
posted 10-16-2002 00:45     Click Here to See the Profile for VANDOO   Click Here to Email VANDOO     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I THINK THE TALBION IS PRIMARLY A TOOL, THE PRIMARY WEAPON WAS THE SPEAR, NEXT THE SHIELD, THEN THE HEAD AXE. THE TALBION TODAY IS USED AS I SUSPECT IT WAS IN THE BEGINNING AS JUNGLE KNIFE, KINDELING WOOD CHOPPER, PERHAPS TO CHOP UP A CHICKEN OR PIG, CUT YOUR BEETLE NUT OR WHATEVER. SOME OF THE LARGER ONES MAY HAVE BEEN PRIMARALY A WEAPON OF WAR THE SMALLER WORK KNIVES WHICH EVERYONE CARRIED FROM OLDER CHILDREN TO WOMEN COULD BE USED FOR DEFENSE AS A SECONDARY FUNCTION. ALL OF THE ONES I SAW BEING CARRIED WERE PLAIN WITH NO DECORATIONS, SO I DON'T KNOW IF SOME WERE CARVED AND KEPT FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS OR IF MOST OF THE DECORATIONS WERE DONE SO SOLDIERS WOULD BUY THEM OR JUST FOR PERSONEL FUN. THE MUSEUM OF HISTORICAL ARMS LISTED THEM AS GOLOCKS FOR YEARS AND I CLASSIFY THEM AS TALBION BECAUSE OF THE SHAPE OF THE BLADE WHICH ARE ALL BASICALLY THE SAME AND QUITE DISTINTIVE FROM A BOLO,KERIS OR KAMPILIAN. MOST ARE A PLAIN LOW END ETHINOGRAPHIC KNIFE AND A GOOD PLACE TO START COLLECTING PHILIPPINE WEAPONS, I MUST BE IN MY SECOND CHILDHOOD AS THATS ABOUT ALL I CAN AFFORD THESE DAYS

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Conogre
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posted 10-16-2002 03:13     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd agree with Barry on all but one point (no pun intended), and that being that of all the Philippine weapons I've seen (and you folks that have been there or descended from there, cut me some slack, ok?**grin**) there is no better weapon for stabbing or a piercing thrust, the closest I can think of being the Flyssa from N. Africa.
If they were designed to be a machete/wood chopper/ betel nut cutter first and formost, I can't help but think that long, wicked, drawn out point on many would be a liability, far too easily broken in heavier chores.
Then again....is skewered chicken a particular delicasy?

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Federico
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posted 10-16-2002 03:25     Click Here to See the Profile for Federico   Click Here to Email Federico     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Conogre:
Then again....is skewered chicken a particular delicasy?


The last time I was watching the Filipino Channel they had a special on a Restaurant in Cebu, whose speciality was skewered chicken.

Again, I get the sneaking suspiscion that we are lumping together knives that are really different. Ive noticed some of the examples have the deep belly with the long pointy tip, while others have more bolo like blades.

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manteris1
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posted 10-16-2002 09:10     Click Here to See the Profile for manteris1   Click Here to Email manteris1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll agree with Barry and Federico, I think the small ones are tools, most of the carved ones are tourist tools, but the big, deep-bellied old ones are real serious weapons...........jimmy

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Ian
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posted 10-16-2002 09:20     Click Here to See the Profile for Ian   Click Here to Email Ian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't think there is a lot of insight in pursuing the tool/weapon dichotomy. There is no doubt that these knives were pressed into service as weapons. Whether they were primarily used as or derived from a tool is speculation and in my mind does not matter very much.

I think Federico has a point in that we have not explored the subtleties of these knives and the ways in which we might discern small regional differences. For example, apart from the "fantasy" hilts, there appears to be at least two main styles of hilts, probably more. One is the tri-lobed, floral form which has a variant that has a projection from the lowest lobe that serves as a partial knuckle guard. The latter feature is, I think, a relatively late development (mostly after 1920 and perhaps post WWII from what I can tell).

Another main type of hilt seems to have a small elliptical or squared off pommel that resembles to my eye a birds head.

In my posting above, I have tried to split the hilts into these main styles.

Then there are the blades. By definition, these are set at an angle to the hilt and have a single chisel edge. I can discern at least two main styles based on the back of the blade -- one style has a straight spine (see, for example, Zel's big old sword above), and the other has a concave shape with an accompanying fat belly.

Based on these observations, we could create a 3x2 table as follows:

.............................Blade style (spine geometry)
...............................Straight.............Concave
Hilt style:
..."Trilobed/Floral"
..."Bird's head"
..."Fantasy"

This provides six cells that might then be linked to provenanced pieces to arrive at a possible nosology.

Just a suggestion.

Ian.

[This message has been edited by Ian (edited 10-16-2002).]

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Conogre
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posted 10-16-2002 11:26     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Once again we've run across an example of a situation where the society is still extant but two or three generations is all that has been needed to erradicateanswers that were probably considered obvious.
In various posts throught this thread, the point has been made that Philippine society has much more fluid and mobil, particularly since WWII, and it's obvious that the "talibon" appears to have been widely accepted wherever it was taken in the Islands.
I like Ian's proposed categorization idea, but as he pointed out, we may actually be muddying the water in relation to two or more seperate forms, based primarily on blade style.
The only point that I could add that seems apparent is carving stlye, particularly in those that seem to have been heavily Moro influenced, for traditional Moro weapons don't seem to have had the same effect moving north that these have moving south.
Another thing I noticed was that of all the wondeful diversity presented here, I don't see anything resembling the distincly Mandaya hilt that made me ask the original questions.
In the end, as a warrior based society moves into an aggrerian or a rural society, to be retained at all, other uses must be found for the weapons, be they utilitarian or ceremonial, or they will simply vanish in the mist, often the only ghosts being cheap or shoddy pieces made to lure the tourists.

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Christopher
Member
posted 10-16-2002 14:51     Click Here to See the Profile for Christopher   Click Here to Email Christopher     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi

I want to use the chance to ask if you think that this knife is also a talibon? It seems to have te same form! Maybe you can help me.
You can also answer me in German!

Währe sehr froh wenn mir jemand einige Infos auf deutsch über das Messer geben könnte.

Thanks / Danke



[This message has been edited by Christopher (edited 10-16-2002).]

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zelbone
Senior Member
posted 10-16-2002 15:19     Click Here to See the Profile for zelbone   Click Here to Email zelbone     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Es tut mir leid. Aber, mein Deutsch ist schlecht! Das Messer is kein talibon. Aber, es kommt von Sumatra aus. Das Messer heisst "Rencong" oder "Rentjong." Die Volk von dieser Messer kommt sind die Aceh.

Okay...I'm sorry if I'm butchering your language, but I thought I'd try . If you didn't understand me, that knife looks like an Aceh rencong from Sumatra.

For books on the subject of Indonesian weapons in German you may want to check this bookseller:

http://www.ethnographicartbooks.com/

They are based I believe in the Netherlands.

[This message has been edited by zelbone (edited 10-16-2002).]

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Conogre
Senior Member
posted 10-16-2002 15:20     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Chrisopher....sorry, nein sprechen zi doitch.
This appears to be a variant of the rentjong from Aceh in Indonesia, rather than from the Philippines.
A very nice looking piece by the way, and also slightly different from the more common style hilt and scabbard.

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MABAGANI
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posted 10-16-2002 15:21     Click Here to See the Profile for MABAGANI     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The sword/weapon became more widely known during the Philippine American War in the fighting against the Pulajan in the eastern Visayan islands of Samar, Leyte and Bilaran. The Pulajan sword is known as "garab", floral carved hilt with cresent shaped blade. I've seen variations with US soldier heads carved hilts, also with revolutionary symbols, fists etc...then the variation with the floral hilt, straight blade. The older variations I would still put in a Pulajan "garab", combat sword category, this term was used by a professor from Bilaran who had relatives in the Pulajan. For some reason "talibon" stuck for everything with a similar shape.

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zelbone
Senior Member
posted 10-16-2002 16:06     Click Here to See the Profile for zelbone   Click Here to Email zelbone     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mabagani, thanks for the information. I always thought that the term "talibon" was too encompassing for all the variations of Visayan swords. If I may ask, would you know the proper name of the sword from the island of Panay with the carved "diety" or "monster" head pommel and chiselled-edge blade? I've never considered these part of the "talibon" family because of the blade form. I have heard them referred to as "tenegres, binagons, and goloks," yet after showing one to my aunt from Aklan, she referred to it as a talibon. My own mother just calls them bolos. In fact, there are a wide variety of blade styles within this certain group of swords as well, with the hilt form and scabbard remaining pretty much consistent.

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Federico
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posted 10-16-2002 16:45     Click Here to See the Profile for Federico   Click Here to Email Federico     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Many thanks Mabagani for the amazing insights. It has definitely changed my view of these weapons. Now if I can just in-grain it in my brain, garab, garab, garab....


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MABAGANI
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posted 10-16-2002 20:52     Click Here to See the Profile for MABAGANI     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd like to know the name of the various demon heads myself. Someday when I get out that way, island hopping... What the talibon and the garab shared in common was the chiseled edge and similar blade shapes. The western Visayan islands fell first during the war, may explain why "talibon" became the generic term.

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Conogre
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posted 10-22-2002 00:53     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hey guys, the one that started this whole thread arrived today, and I lucked out, as it IS a very old working knife/weapon with a heavily lamilar blade AND an incised brass ferule which made me go back and look at all the other posts again......I never realized that a ferule seems quite rare on these.



And of course, getting my other "atypical" talibon out for comparison...well heck, it's not a talibon after all, but rather a demon headed bolo (from the Visayas, based on carving?)
I'd remembered the waist and chisel edge, as well as the clipped point, but had forgotten that the blade was straight.
Once again...thank you all so very much for posting all the wonderful photos and information......strange little threads like this one that snowball are one of the things that keeps, to me at least, this site being one of the premier sources of information on ethnic blades on the internet.

[This message has been edited by Lee Jones (edited 10-23-2002).]

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leaf
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posted 10-23-2002 00:31     Click Here to See the Profile for leaf   Click Here to Email leaf     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very impresive collections as well as very impresive knowlege of Philippine weapons. There are several people here who could collaborate on a great book about Philippine weapons, I don't know if there is any financial gain as it has limited interest but questions raised here certainly show future generations will have even more questions. Cato's book is very good and there is a lot of imfo on Central Luzon Tribes but after that you really have to research to find bit and pieces. I would speculate that the talibon was so popular because it is so light to carry it made a great all purpose tool and weapon in one. Most that I have seen look like the blade got a lot of use and although I'm sure that a lot were made for the tourist don't forget that this is also the land of the jeepneys.

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Conogre
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posted 10-23-2002 22:44     Click Here to See the Profile for Conogre   Click Here to Email Conogre     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OK...now, where's the pic of the one Lee got from Ian...c'mon Lee, quit slouching!!!!

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hooblert
Member
posted 11-11-2003 19:17     Click Here to See the Profile for hooblert   Click Here to Email hooblert     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Conogre:
OK...now, where's the pic of the one Lee got from Ian...c'mon Lee, quit slouching!!!!

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hooblert
Member
posted 11-12-2003 08:58     Click Here to See the Profile for hooblert   Click Here to Email hooblert     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gentlemen,
I have a sword I originally tried to put on the general site, but it hasn't made it's way there yet, that I need help with identifying. I'm new to swords but have had the sword since the early 50's when I found it under an old house. Don't know how to embed the photos, so how do I get it posted?

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Andrew
EEWRS Staff
posted 11-12-2003 10:15     Click Here to See the Profile for Andrew   Click Here to Email Andrew     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi Hooblert. If you've already emailed photos to webmaster@vikingsword.com , they will be posted eventually.

Otherwise, if you've got these photos hosted somewhere, you could always try linking them here.

Andrew

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ruel
Senior Member
posted 11-12-2003 10:36     Click Here to See the Profile for ruel   Click Here to Email ruel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also have one of those talibon with a severed human head in lion's jaws:

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